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Developing DNA-based Chain of Custody Systems for Legally-Sourced Teak

Project Leader
Professor Dr Andrew Lowe
Email
andrew.lowe@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
08 83131149
Inactive project countries
Project Coordinator Phone
0419 496 579
02 6217 0549
Project ID: 
FST/2016/025
Australian Partner
Start Date
23/01/2017
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
TR-202906-88799
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/04/2018
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
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Project Coordinator Email
bartlett@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Mr Tony Bartlett
Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

This Small Research Activity (SRA) aims to develop DNA-based legality verification and chain of custody systems for teak in Laos, Indonesia, Solomon Islands and PNG, where ACIAR has teak projects. In Myanmar and Thailand, it will make sure the teak DNA database represents the SE Asian natural forest and plantations from which teak is harvested. This project builds on two SRAs (FST/2014/028 and FST/2015/007) that developed DNA markers that could be used with teak timber and that studied the teak chains in Indonesia and Myanmar.
Teak is one of the most commercially important timbers in the world. Its timber is durable and water resistant, and is used for boats, buildings, veneer, carving, turnings, and furniture. Illegally logged timber products, including teak, can enter markets through mixing legitimate supply chains and associated document fraud.
Australia works with producer countries to prevent illegal timber entering Australia; this benefits producer countries and improves environmental outcomes globally. Removing doubt about the origin of timber creates certainty for industry and consumers, opens markets for timber, and increases taxation revenue for governments of developing countries. It also provides a mechanism for community forestry suppliers to demonstrate sustainability to the global market.
DNA markers are used to distinguish timber species, source populations and individuals. The cost of this technology is dropping dramatically and is already cost effective when used with document verification audits. DNA technology is suitable for checking chain-of-custody compliance claims, and has been used for species in Indonesia and China.
The University of Adelaide will manage this project, working with the private sector and partners from ACIAR teak projects. The project will make legality compliance systems more efficient, reduce barriers for smallholders and wood manufacturing SMEs, and help Australia to restrict the import of illegally sourced timber.

Project Budget
$250,000.00
Grant Report Value
$275000
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5005
Grant Report Finish Date
30/04/2018

Impact assessment of cocoa interventions in Vanuatu

Project Leader
Dr Alexandra Peralta
Email
alexandra.peralta@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
+61 (0)8 8313 1783
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2016/053
Australian Partner
Start Date
22/11/2016
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RG-202909-53598
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/08/2017
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Centre for Global Food and Resources (GFAR), Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Alternative Communities Trade in Vanuatu, Vanuatu
  • FAO, Fiji
  • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Rodd Dyer
Collaborating Institutions
Alternative Communities Trade in Vanuatu, Vanuatu
FAO, Fiji
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

This SRA aims to evaluate the effect of adopting of ACIAR interventions in cocoa in Vanuatu.
It will:
1. Investigate whether ACIAR project interventions - training in pruning, black pod management, and rat control, chocolate competition and chocolate tasting - triggered adoption of improved production and post-harvest best management practices.
2. Investigate whether adoption of production and post-harvest best management practices resulted in higher yield, improved quality, and increased prices.
3. Draw lessons to guide future interventions in cocoa in the Pacific.
ACIAR has focused on cocoa research in the South Pacific (HORT/2006/009, HORT/2008/046, PARDI/2011/001), as well as in Indonesia (HORT/2010/011) and Papua New Guinea (HORT/2012/026).
In the past decade, an ACIAR scoping study (HORT/2006/009) concluded that Vanuatu (and the Solomon Islands) could become a significant cocoa producer and exporter. Project HORT/2008/046 trained locals to prune cocoa trees, manage black pod, and control rats. Project PARDI/2011/001 concluded that cocoa farmers would only adopt recommended production practices if they had better access to niche markets.
PARDI/2011/001 connected cocoa producers to Australian and US chocolate makers. To have access to these niche markets, farmers had to change their postharvest practices (fermenting and drying) to improve the quality of cocoa beans. These ACIAR interventions aimed to make Ni-Vanuatu smallholder cocoa farmers more competitive. No evidence shows whether farmers adopted the promoted practices, or whether adoption improved welfare.
ACIAR evaluated the effect of cocoa projects in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea (IAS89) and examined the effect on the private sector using cocoa case-studies (IAS90). No rigorous study has yet shown the effect of the interventions from Pacific research. This SRA complements the work of three ACIAR project in the Pacific: the PARDI II umbrella project, AGB/2014/057, and HORT/2014/078.

Project Budget
$88,600.00
Grant Report Value
$97460
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5005
Grant Report Finish Date
31/08/2017

Pacific Agribusiness Research in Development Initiative Phase 2 (PARDI 2)

Project Leader
Dr Lex Thomson
Email
lex.thomson@gmail.com
Fax
Phone
0404 306 663
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2014/057
Start Date
12/06/2017
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
CH-200407-42939
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/05/2021
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Sunshine Coast, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Sunshine Coast, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • Southern Cross University, Australia
  • Pacific Community, Fiji
  • University of the South Pacific, Fiji
  • Pacific Islands Development Forum, Fiji
  • Pacific Island Farmers Organisation Network, Fiji
  • Pacific Islands Private Sector Organization, Fiji
  • University of Queensland, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Rodd Dyer
Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
Southern Cross University, Australia
Pacific Community, Fiji
University of the South Pacific, Fiji
Pacific Islands Development Forum, Fiji
Pacific Island Farmers Organisation Network, Fiji
Pacific Islands Private Sector Organization, Fiji
University of Queensland, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

This project aims to identify and understand how agribusiness development opportunities can improve economic growth and livelihoods in the Pacific.
This project builds on the Pacific Agribusiness Research for Development Initiative (PARDI), a four-year plan to improve marketing opportunities and boost agribusiness in the Pacific.
PARDI 2 will focus on Fiji, Tonga and Vanuatu, representative Pacific Island countries. It will strengthen PARDI’s engagement with other ACIAR projects.
It will study why and how agribusiness developments have succeeded, document how they benefit community livelihoods, and investigate how to extend and make their economic benefits more inclusive and sustainable. It will also identify and overcome constraints and bottlenecks in value and supply chains for primary products.
It will also link to other Pacific donor programs such as the Pacific Horticultural and Agricultural Market Access (PHAMA) program, an Australian Government initiative designed to help Pacific island countries export primary products, and the Market Development Facility (MDF), Australia’s flagship private sector development programme.
Within five years of its conclusion, PARDI 2 is expected to have:
Developed the capacity and provided information for growing at least ten existing agribusinesses and creating at least ten new agribusinesses in the three project countries (>50% operated and/ or managed by females).
Enhanced benefits flowing to rural communities from agribusiness developments.
Contributed to improved agribusiness and sector performance in the project’s focus products in at least two of the three project countries.

Project Budget
$2,602,669.00
Grant Report Value
$2862936
Grant Report Recipient
University of Sunshine Coast
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
4558
Grant Report Finish Date
31/05/2021
Grant Report Start Date
24/05/2017

A strategic approach to pro-poor consumer research in the Mekong region - extended analyses

Project Leader
Dr Wendy Umberger
Email
wendy.umberger@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
08 8313 7263
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2015/029
Australian Partner
Start Date
09/06/2015
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RW-202605-31713
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
15/06/2016
Extension Start Date
16/06/2016
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
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Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Faculty of the Professions, Australia
Extension Finish Date
31/07/2017
Overview Collaborators
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Rodd Dyer
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    This Small Research Activity (SRA) aims to understand changing consumption patterns in urban Vietnam.
    This SRA is a second phase of consumer research following on from market and consumer research in AGB/2012/057. The first phase studied the implications of changing fruit and vegetable market dynamics in the Mekong Region for smallholder farmers and developing pro-poor agribusinesses in the region. Case studies increased understanding of supply-demand patterns, trade flows and changing consumer preferences for fruits and vegetables in north-west Vietnam and south-west China.
    Increased production and improved marketing of vegetables, temperate fruits, tropical fruits and beef in the region can increase household incomes for thousands of poor smallholder farmers. While domestic and regional demand appears to be rapidly growing, farmers lack information about local and regional market opportunities and requirements, and suffer from sub-optimal on-farm and post-harvest management, low farm productivity and poor product quality, consistency, and safety, poor economies of scale, weak links to markets, seasonal price volatility, and increasing competition from regional imports.
    The study will obtain information about household consumption patterns, expenditures on food products types, and other data that may offer profitable and sustainable opportunities for smallholders producing beef, fruits and vegetables.
    This project will complement the market analysis and value chain research activities proposed in AGB/2012/059, AGB2012/060, AGB2012/061 and AGB-2012-048. It will also provide essential market and consumer information about southern Chinese fruit, vegetable and meat markets. It could benefit other ACIAR projects in the MKR, and other investments by international agricultural aid agencies which develop pro-poor agribusinesses and need insight into regional fruit and vegetable markets and consumers.

    Project Budget
    $155,690.00
    Grant Report Value
    $171259
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of Adelaide
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    5005
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/07/2017

    Developing a sustainable business model for upscaling the Agribusiness master class

    Project Leader
    Dr Wendy Umberger
    Email
    wendy.umberger@adelaide.edu.au
    Fax
    Phone
    08 8313 7263
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    AGB/2015/030
    Australian Partner
    Start Date
    20/06/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    RW-202805-32736
    Project Type
    Other
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2016
    Extension Start Date
    01/07/2016
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of Adelaide, Centre for Global Food and Resources (GFAR), Australia
    Extension Finish Date
    31/12/2017
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Centre for Rural Economy Development, Burma
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Rodd Dyer
    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Centre for Rural Economy Development, Burma
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    The Agribusiness Master Class (AMC) aims to develop participants’ knowledge of principles and practical analytical skills needed to apply market, consumer and value chain research methods to real-world agribusiness problems in developing countries.
    An Agribusiness Master Class (AMC) was successfully piloted in Vietnam in 2014/15. Regional demand for agribusiness research skills is still growing, necessitating greater investment in capacity building initiatives such as the AMC.
    After the pilot in Vietnam, this Small Research Activity will demonstrate the model’s flexibility through delivering an appropriately tailored course in Myanmar and develop a sustainable business model for future AMC rollouts.
    A regional partner - HELVETAS Vietnam - will implement and lead the AMC. HELVETAS, in partnership with ACIAR and the Crawford Fund, will develop and test a sponsorship/co-investment with model where agribusinesses and donors support individual participant attendance or sponsor an activity (e.g. guest speakers, networking event etc.). Systems and processes will evaluate, contextualise and refine the AMC. A second AMC in Myanmar in 2016/17 will evaluate these approaches.

    Project Budget
    $101,750.00
    Grant Report Value
    $111925
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of Adelaide
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    5005
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/12/2017
    Grant Report Start Date
    11/06/2015

    Enhancing private sector-led development of the Canarium nut industry in Papua New Guinea

    Project Leader
    Professor Helen Wallace
    Email
    hwallace@usc.edu.au
    Fax
    07 5430 2881
    Phone
    07 5430 1228
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project Coordinator Phone
    0419 496 579
    02 6217 0549
    Project ID: 
    FST/2014/099
    Start Date
    25/06/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    SB-201212-38261
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2018
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
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    Project Coordinator Email
    bartlett@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Mr Tony Bartlett
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    This project seeks to increase commercial processing and expand markets for canarium nuts in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. This project is trialling a range of interventions to reach this goal including market research, technical advice, capacity building, business mentoring and access to infrastructure for both private and public sector stakeholders.
    There are four objectives:
    1. Assess the needs of the private sector to participate in the canarium industry
    2. Develop and undertake research-based interventions that address the needs of the private sector including smallholders, small scale entrepreneurs (especially women) SMEs, and large scale processors
    3. Develop an appropriate commercial model for a medium scale value adding factory for the canarium industry
    4. Create a model for public- private partnerships in the canarium industry in PNG

    The major activities and outputs to date are as follows:
    Interviews with smallholders and young people, market stallholders, industry representatives, Women and Youth in Agriculture (WYIA) network and government staff have been conducted. Barriers to upscaling the sale and processing of nuts include farmers’ knowledge of supply chains and optimising production. Extension requirements of these groups will be further identified and will explore opportunities to engage their young people.
    New market opportunities, particularly those in Port Moresby have been assessed, with a formal launch in Port Moresby planned for 2017. Relationships with a number of key buyers have been developed and a number of new product propositions have been discussed.
    Solar drying has been identified as a method that can enable small scale processors to add value and increase participation in the canarium industry.
    A solar drying training workshop was developed by the project team and delivered in 2015. It was attended by 22 women and youth from the East New Britain Women and Youth in Agriculture association.
    A number of studies have been conducted on nut quality, processing and storage systems. Key findings are: o Kernels of purple fruits contained significantly higher calcium, iron and zinc compared to those of green fruits
    Keeping the testa on during storage may slow down the autoxidation and prevent rancidity of the kernels.
    Short term storage of nuts in freezer results in lower Free Fatty Acid composition.
    An assessment of soil nutrients in cocoa canarium cropping systems compared to cocoa Gliricidia cropping systems has found no differences between canarium and Gliricidia when trees were spaced at 8m X 16m. Some differences were found at an 8 X8 tree spacing. Canarium kernel protein content did not differ in different tree spacings.
    One of the several mechanical crackers investigated shows promise. The Jessie roller cracker has the capacity to crack twenty times the current factory capacity with half the required staff. This will be tested further in the coming years

    This project to date has increased market opportunities on a pilot scale for canarium growers in the Gazelle peninsula of ENB. More than 11 tonnes of nut in pulp were purchased by the NARI factory compared to 5 tonnes in the previous year, with a price of between 50 toea and 1 kina per kg- this represents additional income for canarium growers. A major milestone for the project is that NARI is participating in buying and selling canarium nut in a formal commercial process in East New Britain province. The staff at NARI have commenced selling dried and packaged nuts into the local retail supermarket and to several wholesalers, and demand is strong. Sales of canarium nut product to commercial retail outlets is a first for PNG. The factory successfully bought and processed 11.52 tonnes nut-in-pulp resulting in 263.6 kg kernel being processed. The volumes sold have to date generated 7000 kina for the pilot processing factory. An additional 243kg Kernel - in - Testa is still to be processed.

    NARI staff are developing commercial skills in production, packaging, distribution, sales and marketing by selling canarium products into local markets. Various equipment (e.g. refrigerated container, oven moisture meter and weather station) has been supplied to increase capacity and in some instances dramatically increased operating efficiency of the canarium factory. A refrigerated container for storage will enable large volumes of nuts to be purchased. The fan forced dehydrating oven will more than double the volume of kernels that can be dried at once. TJ’s nutcrackers and fans for the solar dryers have increased availability for ENB WYiA to participate in value adding on a local level.

    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    This project seeks to expand markets and processing of canarium nuts in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea, by strengthening private sector capacity and engagement using nuts from existing trees.
    Canarium indicum is an agroforestry tree in Eastern Indonesia and the Pacific that produces edible nuts. Donor agencies have tried to commercialise the industry in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.
    Nuts could improve the livelihood of the rural poor in developing countries and meet the Millennium Development Goal of eradicating poverty and hunger. Nuts are highly nutritious, can be stored for long periods, and can be sold for cash, processed and exported to distant markets. Women in Papua New Guinea grow and trade canarium nuts; they cultivate, harvest, process and sell them.
    The project will take a whole of value-chain approach. It will research markets, provide technical advice, build capacity, mentor businesses, and give private and public sector stakeholders access to infrastructure. It will target the private sector at three different scales: smallholder and small scale entrepreneurs, small and medium-sized enterprises, and large scale processors.
    This is one of five projects in the Transformative Agriculture and Enterprise Development Program (TADEP) program that aims to foster private sector-led development in agriculture, increase agricultural productive capacity, and give farmers in Papua New Guinea and Bougainville, particularly women farmers, better access to markets.

    Project Budget
    $3,519,080.00
    Grant Report Value
    $3870988
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of the Sunshine Coast
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4558
    Grant Report Finish Date
    30/06/2018
    Grant Report Start Date
    16/06/2015

    Improving soil health, agricultural productivity and food security on atolls

    Project Leader
    Mr Siosiua Halavatau
    Email
    siosiuah@spc.int
    Fax
    679 3370021
    Phone
    679 3370733 ext 35294
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    SMCN/2014/089
    Start Date
    01/10/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    Reference Number
    ML-201509-32993
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/04/2019
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    Commissioned Organisation
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
    • Department of Agriculture, Tuvalu
    • University of Tasmania, Australia
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Robert Edis
    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
    Department of Agriculture, Tuvalu
    University of Tasmania, Australia
    Overview Objectives

    This project aims to improve the livelihoods of the people of coral atolls, Kiribati and Tuvalu in particular, through increased and diversified agricultural production.
    Pacific Island atolls are among the most vulnerable communities on this planet to climate change. Producing food for the people is a priority.
    Malnutrition is a significant concern, and non-communicable diseases (diabetes, heart disease and micronutrient deficiencies) are increasing because few people are aware of the effects of a poor diet. It is difficult to produce food on atolls, because of a narrow genetic base; poorly controlled pests and diseases; poor soil conditions; limited water availability; climate change; and fading traditional knowledge.
    Building stakeholders’ capacity and ensuring good partnership among them will address these critical issues and achieve food security on atolls.
    The research proposed is associated with three ACIAR projects (PC/2010/063 in Samoa and the Solomon Islands; the Soil Health project SMCN/2009/003 based in Fiji, Samoa and Kiribati; and the scoping study SMCN/2014/021 in Kiribati and Tuvalu)

    Project Budget
    $1,030,589.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1133648
    Grant Report Recipient
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    Grant Report Finish Date
    30/04/2019

    Improving returns from community teak plantings in Solomon Islands

    Project Leader
    Dr Tim Blumfield
    Email
    t.blumfield@griffith.edu.au
    Fax
    Phone
    07 3735 6709
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project Coordinator Phone
    0419 496 579
    02 6217 0549
    Project ID: 
    FST/2014/066
    Start Date
    01/07/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    SB-200707-61568
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2019
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    Griffith University, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    bartlett@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    Griffith University, Enrionmental Futures Centre, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • SPE Consulting, Solomon Islands
    • Solomon Islands Government, Ministry of Forestry, Solomon Islands
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Mr Tony Bartlett
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    The project was established to explore the possibilities of milling and drying teak in the plantations, thereby making it more easily and cost effectively transportable to a woodyard where it would be prepared for export. This meant finding a highly portable milling system and developing the protocols for managing the timber. The choice of truly portable mills is very limited. In developed countries, portable is equal to towable or at least capable of being transported via truck. In Solomon Islands terms, any equipment must be capable of being transported by small open boat and then carried to the site often over steep and difficult terrain. After an extensive search of all available options on the internet, the most suitable model was identified and following a day of testing in Australia was purchased for the trial. The model chosen was a chainsaw mill as chainsaws are readily understood technology and commonplace in Solomon Islands. Other models of mills, which are generally quite heavy, have either a circular blade that usually swings through 90 degrees to cut both depth and width, or a bandsaw blade.
    Initial results are good with the mill producing high quality, accurately dimensioned, square billets (timber that has been sawn on all 4 sides at a maximum size and that can be re-sawn later). The frame of the mill is light enough for 2 people to carry though all the extra equipment, chainsaws and winches, as well as supplies for the day still make this heavy work requiring a number of people. Once established on-site, the mill frame is left in place until milling ceases but other equipment such as winches and chainsaws are secured in a house belonging to a village elder or chief when the crew are absent.
    As with the development of any novel system, there have been teething problems, mainly to do with equipment and maintenance, but these are being resolved as they occur and it is anticipated that the mill should be able to produce 2 cubic metres of sawn timber per week. The primary stage of drying the milled timber occurs in the plantation as the green timber is still too heavy to carry any distance. The timber milled thus far has been carefully stacked in layers by size with spacers equally and regularly placed between the layers to facilitate drying without warping. A cover to provide shade has been has made from the off cut sections of the logs. It is anticipated that the timber will dry for at least 2 months before transport, but this will be dependent upon the moisture testing that is taking place monthly. Further testing of the mill will proceed over the rest of the year and the team are also looking at the various options for testing other mills that may not be as lightweight as the current model but capable of greater productivity. It may be that these mills will have a role to play in areas where access to the plantation is not difficult.
    The project has been keenly aware of the need to establish a full chain of custody for the timber in order to fulfil any future requirements regarding legality. The project is in the process of obtaining a milling licence from the Solomon Islands Government and established a recording protocol that exceeds current requirements demanded by the Australian and New Zealand governments. Each piece of timber produced will be capable of tracing back to the plot it was harvested from and the owner of the tree.
    The research into the impact of the introduction of these technologies and the potential for income generation has begun. A series of village visits has been undertaken by the project social team and a questionnaire has been handed out to the communities involved so that they have a chance to discuss the questions amongst themselves prior to the next visit. Initial consultations with local exporters have also taken place and, as the nature and quality of the product of the mill become apparent, these discussions will more tightly focus on eventual markets for the timber that has been milled.
    In the two visits to Munda since November 2015, the social and economic community impact team has visited all of the six communities (at least once) that will be the main study focus for the project. This has included overnight stays. The team has made substantial progress in terms of building familiarity, trust and goodwill, and also in terms of our understanding of the specific conditions, customs and meanings of the individual communities. The main community impact team activities with the six villages have been centred upon discussions about: the purpose and intent of the community impact research of the project; building awareness about relevant social and economic factors associated with the project and aspects that the community would like to be considered in the study. The visits also provided additional information about the nature of the trial programs and attempted to enhance an integrated community understanding of the project goals.

    Collaborating Institutions
    Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    SPE Consulting, Solomon Islands
    Solomon Islands Government, Ministry of Forestry, Solomon Islands
    Southern Cross University, Australia
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    This project aims to develop a practical model suited to Small Island States that enables small scale teak plantations to be used and provides growers with good returns. This will be achieved by developing strategies that allow growers to maximise the volume of timber they can obtain from their plantations.
    The Ministry of Forestry estimated in 2014 that there were 15,000 hectares of plantations owned by 21,000 separate groups or individual growers in the Solomon Islands. Many of these plantations were planted between 1995 and 2000 and now need thinning or clear-felling. While the quality of the timber is good, many trees are so poor they cannot be sold commercially as round logs. Round logs, moreover, are difficult to transport to the nearest port. In Cape York Peninsula, where sandalwood occurs naturally, options for commercial development are often limited, but ACIAR project FST/2008/010 showed that forestry provides one of the few promising opportunities.
    Turning moribund plantations into economic opportunities will show communities they can derive sustainable income from plantations. Women may develop secondary drying as a business opportunity. Increasing the area of degraded secondary forest that is brought back into productive forest management will provide timber for local processing and sale.

    Project Budget
    $1,199,998.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1319998
    Grant Report Recipient
    Griffith University
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4111
    Grant Report Finish Date
    30/06/2019
    Grant Report Start Date
    17/05/2015

    Enhancing value added products and environmental benefits from agroforestry systems in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific

    Project Leader
    Professor Helen Wallace
    Email
    hwallace@usc.edu.au
    Fax
    07 5430 2881
    Phone
    07 5430 1228
    Inactive project countries
    Project Coordinator Phone
    0419 496 579
    02 6217 0549
    Project ID: 
    FST/2014/067
    Start Date
    01/10/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    SB-200807-40844
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    31/07/2019
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    bartlett@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    • Ministry of Trade, Commerce, Industry and Tourism, Vanuatu
    • National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    • Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labour and Immigration, Solomon Islands
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Mr Tony Bartlett
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    Approximately 80% of people in PNG and the Pacific Islands live in rural areas and earn their livelihoods from agriculture, fishing and forestry. Rural farmers generally have limited markets for their produce, and little access to distant markets. Processing and value-adding can enhance market access, especially if products can be processed locally and transported to distant markets or central distributors.
    Agroforestry tree species are widely grown in the Pacific Islands and provide multiple products such as food, timber and many other products. Agroforestry trees provide ecosystem services including soil protection, enhanced biodiversity and help to reduce the severe impacts of climate change. There is great potential to value-add to primary products from agroforestry crops in Pacific countries. However, a market- driven approach is needed to identify the best opportunities for value-added products from agroforestry crops. In addition, agroforestry crops, especially tree crops may take several years to produce marketable products and smallholders need incentives in the short term to encourage investment in tree crops. Tree crops can be integrated into agroforestry systems with other short term crops such as taro, sweet potato and banana to produce a return on investment more quickly. However, there is little information on the performance of these integrated agroforestry systems in terms of the best species selection, crop production, and economic and environmental benefits to smallholders.
    This project explores opportunities for new value-added agroforestry products to improve livelihoods in PNG, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. This research is identifying the best opportunities for value-adding, and researching value-adding techniques for these products. We are also investigating integrated agroforestry systems in Fiji and Vanuatu that are likely to have environmental benefits such as catchment revegetation along with economic returns to smallholders.
    Objectives
    Identify multipurpose agroforestry crops with market potential to be value-added in all four countries
    Develop techniques and enhance small to medium enterprises ability to participate in value-adding
    Enable enhanced and gender equitable smallholder participation in agroforestry crop production
    Develop and pilot test catchment revegetation systems linked to markets
    Build capacity and disseminate research findings
    Activities and outputs to date:
    Inventories, reviews and key informant interviews have commenced in all countries to determine key opportunities for value adding to agroforestry crops
    A spreadsheet of agroforestry opportunities and key criteria for selection across the 4 countries has been developed. These have been modified through consultation with key public and private sector stakeholders in each of the 4 countries.
    We are working with newly formed women’s groups in Vanuatu and Fiji to develop strategies to increase income opportunities
    13 potential sites have been identified in Fiji and Vanuatu where pilot agroforestry sites could be established
    Tourism industries stakeholders (Shangri La Resort, Warwick, P&O) have been identified that are keen to collaborate on catchment rehabilitation and supply of traditional food crop between smallholders and the tourism industry.
    Participatory Impact Pathway Monitoring and Evaluation Plan has been developed

    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Southern Cross University, Australia
    Ministry of Trade, Commerce, Industry and Tourism, Vanuatu
    National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labour and Immigration, Solomon Islands
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    The project aims to enhance economic, social and environmental benefits from market-focused agroforestry crop systems in the Pacific and improve management of degraded catchments in Fiji and Vanuatu.
    80% of people in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific Islands live in rural areas and earn their livelihoods from agriculture, fishing and forestry. Agroforestry tree species are widely grown in the Pacific Islands and provide food and timber. Agroforestry trees also protect the soil from erosion, increase biodiversity and help to alleviate effects of climate change such as cyclones. Pacific countries can add value to agroforestry crops by processing them, especially if they can stabilise products locally and transport them to distant markets. A market-driven approach is needed to identify the best opportunities for value-added products from agroforestry crops. Agroforestry crops, especially trees, may take several years to produce a crop, and smallholders need short-term incentives to invest in tree crops.
    This project explores opportunities to value add new agroforestry products in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. This research identifies the best opportunities for value-adding, and is developing value-adding techniques for these products. It is also investigating integrated agroforestry systems in Fiji and Vanuatu that are likely to have environmental benefits such as catchment revegetation and economic returns to smallholders.

    Project Budget
    $2,416,941.00
    Grant Report Value
    $2658635
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of the Sunshine Coast
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4558
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/07/2019
    Grant Report Start Date
    08/09/2015

    Aligning genetic resources, production and post-harvest systems to market opportunities for Pacific island and Australian cocoa

    Project Leader
    Mr Yan Diczbalis
    Email
    yan.diczbalis@daff.qld.gov.au
    Fax
    07 4064 2249
    Phone
    07 4064 1128
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    HORT/2014/078
    Start Date
    12/04/2017
    Project Coordinator Fax
    Reference Number
    HL-202107-46923
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2020
    Extension Start Date
    30/06/2017
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
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    Project Coordinator Email
    Commissioned Organisation
    Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
    Extension Finish Date
    31/07/2021
    Overview Collaborators
    • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    • Ministry of Agriculture, Fiji
    • Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Samoa
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Solomon Islands
    • Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Forestry, Fisheries and Biosecurity, Vanuatu
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Richard Markham
    Collaborating Institutions
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    Ministry of Agriculture, Fiji
    Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Samoa
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Solomon Islands
    Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Forestry, Fisheries and Biosecurity, Vanuatu
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    This project aims to strengthen cocoa value chains in the South Pacific islands (Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) and Australia.
    Cocoa is an important agricultural export for South Pacific countries. Some 310,000 people are estimated to be directly involved in cocoa production. Some 30,000 households in Papua New Guinea, 13,000 households in Solomon Islands and 8,700 households in Vanuatu - between a fifth and a third of these countries’ populations - are involved in the cocoa industry. Significant domestic or potentially useful export industries also exist in Samoa and Fiji.
    This project will build on past work by adopting a “whole of chain” approach, focused on specific market needs and opportunities: evaluating and disseminating appropriate genetic resources, raising agronomic productivity, and developing and encouraging the uptake of best practice in fermentation and drying to optimise cocoa quality.
    The research strategy draws on expertise available in Papua New Guinea and complements ongoing work there, but focuses on the smaller Pacific islands.

    Project Budget
    $2,307,857.00
    Grant Report Value
    $2538643
    Grant Report Recipient
    Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4859
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/07/2021
    Grant Report Start Date
    06/06/2016

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