Pages

Pacific Agribusiness Research for Development Initiative

Project Leader
Dr Steven Underhill
Email
steven.underhill@deedi.qld.gov.au
Fax
61 7 3896 9444
Phone
61 7 3371 6429
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2008/044
Start Date
01/02/2010
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
BR-202910-53646
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/01/2014
Extension Start Date
20/01/2014
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Queensland, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Australia
Extension Finish Date
31/01/2015
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
  • James Cook University, Australia
  • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
  • University of the South Pacific, Fiji
  • Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Richard Markham
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

PARDI commenced in February 2010 and is currently on-track against project milestones.
To date, nine rapid supply chain reviews covering taro, cassava, breadfruit, coconut, pearls, sea cucumber, canarium nut, value added fisheries, and high value timber have been undertaken. A further ten partial reviews have been completed for virgin coconut oil (VCO), sweet potato, vegetables, yam, cocoa, coffee, vanilla, ginger, teak and mahogany.
To ensure integration of consumer and market demands impacting on these chains, we have also undertaken Fiji municipal markets and consumer household surveys, taro consumer preference studies in the Sydney and Auckland markets, and a Vanuatu tourist consumer study on cocoa and canarium nut products.
A further four chains will be assessed over the next few months including; sea cucumber industries (Fiji and Tonga), Mahogany (Fiji), Tamarind (Vanuatu) and participatory based reviews (Vanuatu).
As a consequence of these reviews, an initial four PARDI-funded research projects were commenced in late 2010 and early 2011. Collectively, PARDI now has project-based activities across all target Pacific countries (Fiji [3], Samoa [1], Tonga [3], Solomon Islands [1], Vanuatu [1] and Kiribati [1]). Project details below:
PRA 2010.01 - This James Cook University (JCU) led project is working to increase cultured pearl production capacity and improve quality in the Fiji and Tongan cultured pearl industries.
PRA 2010.02- This University of the South Pacific (USP) led project aims to evaluate and develop new value adding products and technologies for Tilapia and Caulerpa (seaweed spp.) for commercial application in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.
PRA 2010.04- This Southern Cross University (SCU) led project is undertaking a scoping study associated with the development of village-based training programmes and information sources for better postharvest handling and processing of sea cucumber in Fiji, Tonga and Kiribati.
PRA 2010.03 - A joint PARDI (Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) and ACIAR funded (PNG) project recently started, that aims to develop consumer-driven value-adding strategies and process techniques to support an emerging Canarium nut industry.
Supporting this portfolio are a series of ongoing small research activities (SRA) that include; consumer acceptance of the new taro cultivars, virgin coconut oil (VCO) chain assessment, PARDI Advisory Group operations, how best to create small-holder impacts from PARDI outputs, cocoa chain business case, and strategies for assessing and transferring capabilities.
The PARDI Advisory Group is currently reviewing a further five proposal, these include:
Creating export-orientated breadfruit production in Fiji
Producing high quality taro material in support of re-building Samoan taro exports
Premium market opportunities for smallholder cocoa producers in Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands
Understand the impacts of population dynamics on supply chains
Establishing a series of pilot scale participatory guarantee schemes for vegetables

Much of PARDI’s supply-chain driven research projects have only recently commenced. Consequently it is pre-mature to demonstrate research outputs and impacts. Preliminary project-specific activities include:

PRA 2010.01 (Pearls): Pearl farmers and market structure research has been completed for Tonga and Fiji, a project-funded staff (Jamie Whitford) appointed, and initial farmer training commenced. A full-time Fiji-based project scientist was appointed in May 2011.
PRA 2010.02 (value-adding fisheries) Desk-top studies for Fiji, Samoa & Tonga markets, and analysis of chains in Fiji and Samoa have been completed. Work is ongoing for Tonga outer island groups.
PRA 2010.04 (Sea cucumber): Supply and value chains in Fiji and Tonga have been documented. An evaluation of export chains for processed product from Pacific into Asian markets is anticipated shortly. Tonga and Kiribati field trips are ongoing
SRA 2010.01 (Taro consumer study): Taro sensory testing has been completed in Fiji and Auckland markets and a final report completed.

PARDI has completed three training and development initiatives in the Pacific, including a pearl farmer training workshop in Tonga (Nov 2010), survey training for USP students (Dec 2010), and value chain analysis teaching workshop, Vanuatu (May 2011). Further targeted training of fisheries staff is ongoing (PRA 2010.01 and PRA 2010.04).

To ensure effective project communication we have held six coordination workshops, prepared two six-monthly newsletters, and plan to shortly post PARDI research reports on SPC’s LRD website.

PARDI has participated in series meetings to establish close links with other current ACIAR and donor-funded activities in the region. Through the assistance of SPC and ACIAR, strong engagement with other ACIAR and EU-funded projects particularly in taro and cocoa are emerging; and with PHAMA in cocoa and canarium nut.
Finally, over the last 6 months the PARDI team has increased by 30 staff. There are presently 51 PARDI research staff; with the possibility of a further 19 staff dependant on the outcome of research proposals reviews.
To ensure pending commissioned projects have sufficient operational time, PARDI has requested and been granted a variation to extend the project completion date to January 2015.

PARDI conducts value chain analysis and research to strengthen selected value chains in Pacific horticulture, fisheries and forestry products. This year’s achievements include:
16 technical training workshops have been held.
28 industry and government stakeholders are receiving targeted capacity building and technical support.
17 higher degree students are linked to PARDI projects.
Three major consumer and market place studies have been undertaken:
1. Retail transformation market study - 1000 households in Fiji;
2. Consumer study for Canarium and chocolate products - 400 tourists in Vanuatu;
3. Study of teak supply capabilities in Solomon Islands and a global market analysis is well advanced.
Cocoa. Work has continued with cocoa value chain stakeholders in Vanuatu and the Solomon islands. The collaboration continues to expand to include the Vanuatu statistics office, two new chocolate importers, and PHAMA as well as facilitation for an annual Vanuatu Cocoa Industry Strategic Workshop.
Breadfruit. Research trials and infrastructure associated with the PARDI breadfruit project were severely impacted by flooding in early 2012. A large number (2000) root suckers and marcotts are now ready for field trials. SPC has released nearly 200 tissue-cultured trees. Three orchards have been established and a total of 350 trees planted.
Taro. CePaCT has continued working on taro virus indexing and elimination, in support of the Samoan taro-leaf-blight breeding program. Two virus-elimination methods have been selected, which have proven effective against some TaBV and DsMV infecting cycle-7 taro. Agronomic assessments are being undertaken monthly, with soil tests on selected parameters almost completed. Corms are being sequentially harvested to determine the optimum age for harvesting. A market-based consumer-acceptance study of selected varieties amongst Samoans living in Auckland, New Zealand, was recently completed.
Vegetables. This project seeks to improve smallholder vegetable farmers (Fiji and Solomon Islands) access to high-value domestic markets, through the development of participatory guarantee schemes (PGS). Two target resort partners and four core PGS grower groups have been identified. An industry stakeholder workshop was held in November 2012. An assessment of postharvest wastage has been undertaken. In the Solomon Islands, an audit of farm business management skills has been undertaken.
Protective cropping crops. This new project seeks to address poor product quality and short seasonality, through the development and application of protective cropping systems in Fiji and Samoa. A preliminary assessment of existing protective cropping infrastructure has been completed, with current effort focussed on establishing four trial sites.
Pearls. Development plans for pearl industries in Fiji and Tonga have been drafted. A national spat collection program was initiated in Fiji, in partnership with Fiji Fisheries. Spat collection equipment has been deployed to communities adjacent to pearl farms throughout the country, to provide an on-going supply of oysters for current pearl farms, thus addressing a key bottleneck for the industry. A series of capacity-building workshops have been held. A survey of the mother-of-pearl (MOP) handicraft industry in Fiji showed that this sector had an annual value of more than F$10 million of which more than 85% is based on MOP items imported from Asia.
Value-added fisheries products. Marketing strategy and market chains have been developed and tested for tilapia and Caulerpa (sea grapes). In Fiji a cold-chain HACCP analysis is needed for Caulerpa. The shelf-life of Caulerpa has been extended up to 12 days and a research partnership with the private sector is assessing how this can be incorporated into the supply chain (for the export market).
Tamarind. The value chain map has been completed. Research has demonstrated that a solar dryer was more efficient than passive sun drying for tamarind and that the fruit dries to a commercially acceptable water activity level after two days of fine weather in the solar dryer. Microbiological test results indicated that all samples met Australian food standards.
Canarium. The industry has increased since the start of the project with a private-sector partner now selling product in supermarkets and planning to triple production to 1.5 tonnes in the coming year. Research on tree selection has shown that the profitability of the industry could be greatly increased by selecting trees with large kernels and high kernel recovery.
Teak. The social research team visited collaborating villages in Solomon Islands to document areas of concern for growers. Grower and plantation operations were then assessed to identify market drivers for teak and their effect on grower participation.
PARDI publications, reports and newsletters are available online: http://www.spc.int/lrd

Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Australia
University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
James Cook University, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, Australia
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Land Resources Division, Fiji
University of the South Pacific, Faculty of Business and Economics, Fiji
Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Centre for Tropical Agriculture, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

Significant challenges face Pacific island countries (PICs) in improving livelihoods and overcoming poverty - in particular, food and fuel price surges in 2008, the impact of the global economic crisis, a number of natural disasters, difficulties maintaining infrastructure and the negative effects of climate change. PICs and international agencies acknowledge that the way to meet many of these challenges is to improve competitiveness of industries and thus provide a platform for stronger economic growth. This project will study issues particularly affecting food production and agricultural sector development. These include isolation from key growth markets and limited coordination of supply chains. There is a growing presence of internationally supported economic development programs that address some of these issues in the region; this project, involving ACIAR’s Pacific Agribusiness Research for Development Initiative (PARDI), will complement that work with a focus on research for development to underpin the competitiveness of targeted high-value agriculture, fisheries and forestry products.

Project Budget
$9,991,706.00
Grant Report Value
$10990877
Grant Report Recipient
University of Queensland
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
4068
Grant Report Finish Date
31/01/2015
Grant Report Start Date
05/02/2010

Developing markets and products for the Papua New Guinea Canarium nut industry

Project Leader
Professor Helen Wallace
Email
hwallace@usc.edu.au
Fax
07 5430 2881
Phone
07 5430 1228
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project Coordinator Phone
0419 496 579
02 6217 0549
Project ID: 
FST/2010/013
Start Date
01/05/2012
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RH-201602-39126
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/04/2016
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
bartlett@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Mr Tony Bartlett
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

We have made excellent progress against the first year’s milestones.

The major scientific achievements are:

Research on tree selection shows that the profitability of the industry could be greatly increased by selecting trees with large kernels and high kernel recovery. In some cases the kernels of the best selections are around twice the size of the worst.
Trials of a new processing methods of drying fresh kernels show that temperatures of above 60C will reduce kernel moisture content to below 5 % in only 1 hour whereas drying at 50 C does not reduce moisture substantially below 10 %. These results highlight the need for efficient drying systems at the correct temperature.
Early results indicate that the nuts need to be drier when packaged than currently is the case in order to prolong storage.
Microbiological test results of samples taken through the processing chain indicated that samples were mostly acceptable for Australian food standards, although many were marginal. This highlights the need for improving food safety standard during processing.
Key negative impacts on market and product development include the lack of capacity to supply product, maintain a consistent quality and quantity supply, and need for product specifications, all of which currently impact people’s desire and capacity to be involved in the industry. Initial benchmarking data have been collected, against which final benchmarking data will be gathered, to ascertain impacts on the socio-economic livelihoods of smallholders. Key benchmarking indicators include growth in plantings and harvesting, the domestic industry and the commercial industry and associated profit returns, progress on standardization of the industry, and capacity (knowledge of growing and marketing needs, as well as ability to supply).

This project has built capacity through training, and suppling equipment. Processors in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu have benefited from training on nut quality and ways to improve quality and shelf life. Project staff from USC and University of Adelaide are working in partnership with chain champions in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu staff to improve processes for drying, moisture loss and shelf life and have provided training, information and equipment to processors.

Staff at the Solomon Islands Ministry of Forests have been trained in assessing tree volume, early fruiting and flowering. They were also trained in weighing and measuring fruit and how replication influences the experimental design. Scientific ovens were installed in the Vanuatu Department of Forests, Port Vila and staff at the Vanuatu Department of Forests were involved in oven drying trials.

In the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu new markets for canarium products are opening up for farmers as more processors become involved and are buying larger quantities of product from farmers. The canarium industry in Vanuatu is growing and currently 5 organisations have expressed an interest in processing canarium products, and most are already actively processing. The industry has increased since the start of the project with a new processor now selling product in supermarket shelves. They commenced processing in 2011 and processed 500 kg of kernel in 2012 and are planning to triple production to 1.5 tonnes in the coming year. Interest in the canarium Industry in the Solomon Islands is strong. The Nut Grower’s Association Solomon Islands (NGASI) now has 500 members and is led by Richard Pauku (Maraghoto Holdings).

In PNG staff at NARI have been involved in experimental planning for kernel drying, storage and roasting experiments. This training has resulted in several experiments being commenced. Interest among farmers in East New Britain, PNG has increased with large plantings of canarium seedlings supplied by NARI. Approximately 200,000 trees have been produced in the NARI nursery and distributed to small holders and cocoa plantations over the past four years. At present there is no commercial market or processing factory for these nuts and the focus of the next 2 years will be to partner with commercial partners to drive the nut processing industry.

We have made excellent progress against the milestones. The industry has continued to grow in Vanuatu with five processors and value adders and increased production of value added product. A pilot processing factory opened at NARI in PNG as a showcase for processing techniques developed in this and previous ACIAR projects. We have identified new market opportunities, developed marketing plans and protocols for new products and examined food safety.
The major achievements are:
We have learnt more about the different market segments, consumer preferences and product development opportunities as we have conducted multiple surveys and interviews in all countries. Tourists were most interested in raw, roasted/salted and chocolate coated products and were willing to pay between 500-1000 Vatu (AUD$5-10) for a packet of snack nuts.
A survey of Australian nut enterprises showed that 67% of companies believed canarium nuts have commercial appeal in the Australian market. The most suitable market segments suggested were health stores, gourmet food, boutique stores, bakery and confectionary. Best value adding was thought to be roasted and salted.
Other export market opportunities have been identified, with nut samples provided to Haigh’s chocolates and also canarium oil to Jurlique for possible inclusion as an active ingredient in their skin care range. One company has expressed interest in canarium oil as an ingredient in hair care products.
Paradise Foods in PNG has been identified as a potential private sector champion of canarium products. They developed a pilot cookie with canarium products and produced artwork for the packaging.
A canarium fair is being planned by NARI in PNG for September this year.
A draft canarium nut marketing strategy for the direct business-to-consumer market has been prepared for Lapita Caf.
Microbial testing highlighted the need for improved food safety standards during processing.
Shelf-life experiments have demonstrated that using a domestic vacuum-packaging system dried kernels can be stored with no decrease in quality for six months.
Protocols for roasting, salt roasted and sugar coated have been developed and information shared between countries.
An extensive data set has been gathered on the best performing families of trees from the SPRIG trial on Kolumbungara Is, Solomon Islands.
The project has built capacity through:
A regional stakeholder workshop in Honiara, where participants from Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and Australia shared information and experiences. In particular, information sharing networks were established between the Vanuatu Department of Forests and the Solomon Islands Ministry of Forests, and processors from the two countries.
Helping to develop processing techniques for the NARI pilot factory.
Lapita Caf owners Votausi MacKenzie-Reur and Geordie MacKenzie visited the Sunshine Coast, Australia in April 2014 to gain information on product development and marketing strategies from macadamia factories and marketing experts in Australia.
USC staff are currently conducting a shelf life storage experiment for Doni Kelly, owner of Jedon Organic Food Ltd in Honiara, Solomon Islands, and assisting with information on processing protocols.
Training on the solar drying by the Department of Industry in Vanuatu on the PARDI tamarind project has opened up access for farmers to dry and sell canarium products.

Collaborating Institutions
National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
University of Adelaide, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

Canarium indicum is an indigenous tree throughout the South Pacific, producing edible nuts as well as timber. The nuts are little known in international markets, but there is strong domestic demand in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Processing and value adding to canarium nuts would open up world nut markets to Pacific Island countries. This project will build on domestic markets while investigating value-adding and processing opportunities for both domestic and export markets. Research will address problems in quantity and quality of supply, processing techniques, and in types of products and markets within and between the three countries.

Project Budget
$483,051.00
Grant Report Value
$531356
Grant Report Recipient
University of the Sunshine Coast
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
4558
Grant Report Finish Date
30/04/2016
Grant Report Start Date
04/04/2012

Enhancing livelihoods and food security from agroforestry and community forestry in Nepal

Project Leader
Dr Ian Nuberg
Email
ian.nuberg@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
08 8313 7109
Phone
08 8313 0527
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project Coordinator Phone
0419 496 579
02 6217 0549
Project ID: 
FST/2011/076
Start Date
01/04/2013
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RW-201912-52919
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/03/2018
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
bartlett@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • University of New South Wales, Australia
  • World Agroforestry Centre, Indonesia
  • International Union for Conservation of Nature, Nepal
  • Department of Forests, Nepal
  • Nepal Agroforestry Foundation, Nepal
  • ForestAction Nepal, Nepal
  • SEARCH Nepal, Nepal
  • Tribhuvan University, Nepal
  • Federation of Community Forest Users, Nepal, Nepal
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Mr Tony Bartlett
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

The project has made important progress in various aspects of fieldwork, enhancing clarity of roles, improved communication channels, and defining procedures for research and research communication activities. The significant achievements of this first year concern the development of working relationships among project researchers, stakeholders, participating landholders and community forestry user groups (CFUGs). We have worked through some of the vagaries of roles, responsibility and accountability that existed after the Inception workshop by appointing an in-country project leader, Dr Naya Sharma Paudel, 3 Research Group Leaders, 5 disciplinary leaders (modelling; market; institutions, access and equity; policy; GIS;) and 2 activity coordinators (baseline survey; field action research).
This required a lot of discussion and documentation within the project team to develop:
1. roles and responsibilities of partners, especially among Nepal members;
2. resource allocation and acquittal processes;
3. research methodology integrating quantitative and qualitative research methods; and
4. system of communication and coordination across research teams /themes
The project structure is working well. However, the engagement, coordination and delivery are uneven across the 7 research activities. We started liberally with a large group of individuals suggested by the partner organisations in Nepal, and now we are settling on a more realistic number of researchers. Only about a third of the individuals listed on the project appear to be actively engaged. We expect that the team membership will evolve and we will continue to revisit the roles of marginally active researchers in the upcoming action research meetings for better streamlining the research investment and teamwork. This achievement will provide a solid foundation for effective work for the next four years.
The engagement of stakeholder-partners such Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation (MFSC) and Federation of Community Forest Users in Nepal (FECOFUN) is critical for the success of this project and considerable effort has been directed to secure this. We have been able to hold several rounds of meetings with the heads of DoF and Secretary of the Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation, and have been able to work collaboratively with DFO at the field level. The relationship with FECOFUN at the district level has become firmer but still needs to be field-tested and nurtured especially on the role of FECOFUN centre.
We have engaged six village research sites (aligned with six village development committees - VDCs) across Kavre and Lamjung districts and 24 CFUGs around them. A comprehensive baseline survey of 600 households across the sites has gathered quantitative and some qualitative data. This base-line survey will inform our discussions with farmers and CFUGs as we develop innovative agroforestry and community forestry systems and institutions in a participative process. The baseline survey data will also inform the modelling activity which will be used to estimate the impact of these innovations on food security and livelihoods. We have also planned qualitative baseline report covering household, community and district level data to complete the household survey. We developed both qualitative and quantitative baseline framework through extensive face-to-face and basecamp-based meetings and discussions (Refs: 2014_ 38 to 41).
The overarching research framework is that of action research that integrates biophysical, market, social,institutional and policy research activities. In this reporting period the project has had one full action research cycle: from Inception in May 2013 to Action Research Planning Meeting (ARPM) #1 in January 2014. It is also been through most of the second cycle as we schedule ARPM#2 for July 2014. This framework is working effectively because the Nepal partners, all with a long history in community forestry, are well-acquainted with deliberative action research processes. We are still refining the methodology to suit various research objectives, and anticipate that one of the science outcomes of the project could be more refined version of AR methodologies that can work better in Nepalese context. Our use of the online project management platform, Basecamp has been very useful for facilitating some deliberative processes.

Collaborating Institutions
University of New South Wales, Australia
World Agroforestry Centre, Indonesia
International Union for Conservation of Nature, Nepal
Department of Forests, Nepal
Nepal Agroforestry Foundation, Nepal
ForestAction Nepal, Nepal
SEARCH Nepal, Nepal
Tribhuvan University, Nepal
Federation of Community Forest Users, Nepal, Nepal
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

Nepal ranks as the 17th poorest country in the world, with 41% of the population reportedly under-nourished and 30 of its 75 districts food insecure. Sixty six per cent of the population lives off a combination of agriculture and forest products. Factors preventing forestry systems from providing adequate livelihoods include low productivity, sub-optimal management, limited marketing opportunities and inequitable centralised planning and service delivery.

This project in the Middle Hills of Nepal has three main objectives, to improve: the capacity of household-based agroforestry systems, the functioning of community-based forestry systems, and the productivity of and equitable access to under-utilised agricultural land. The research will focus on tree-crop-livestock interactions, community forest management, forestry product marketing, policy and regulatory constraints, and under-utilisation of arable land.

The main outputs will include improved management of agroforestry and community forestry systems through biophysical practices and institutional and governance models. The project will also provide insights into improving existing markets and creating new markets for forest products, and approaches to bring abandoned agricultural land back into productive and equitable use.

Project Budget
$2,500,006.00
Grant Report Value
$2750007
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
Grant Report Finish Date
31/03/2018
Grant Report Start Date
22/02/2013

Proof on concept: verification of chain of custody of teak in Indonesia using DNA markers

Project Leader
Professor Dr Andrew Lowe
Email
andrew.lowe@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
08 83131149
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project Coordinator Phone
0419 496 579
02 6217 0549
Project ID: 
FST/2014/028
Australian Partner
Start Date
10/06/2014
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
SB-202005-53635
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/12/2014
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
bartlett@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Forest Research and Development Agency, Indonesia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Mr Tony Bartlett
Collaborating Institutions
Forest Research and Development Agency, Centre for Biotechnology and Forest Tree Improvement, Indonesia
Program Areas
Project Budget
$60,000.00
Grant Report Value
$66000
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5005
Grant Report Finish Date
31/12/2014

Pacific Agribusiness Research for Development Initiative

Project Leader
Dr Steven Underhill
Email
steven.underhill@deedi.qld.gov.au
Fax
61 7 3896 9444
Phone
61 7 3371 6429
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
HORT/2008/044
Start Date
01/02/2010
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
BR-202910-53646
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/01/2014
Extension Start Date
20/01/2014
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Queensland, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Australia
Extension Finish Date
31/01/2015
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
  • James Cook University, Australia
  • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
  • University of the South Pacific, Fiji
  • Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Richard Markham
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

PARDI commenced in February 2010 and is currently on-track against project milestones.
To date, nine rapid supply chain reviews covering taro, cassava, breadfruit, coconut, pearls, sea cucumber, canarium nut, value added fisheries, and high value timber have been undertaken. A further ten partial reviews have been completed for virgin coconut oil (VCO), sweet potato, vegetables, yam, cocoa, coffee, vanilla, ginger, teak and mahogany.
To ensure integration of consumer and market demands impacting on these chains, we have also undertaken Fiji municipal markets and consumer household surveys, taro consumer preference studies in the Sydney and Auckland markets, and a Vanuatu tourist consumer study on cocoa and canarium nut products.
A further four chains will be assessed over the next few months including; sea cucumber industries (Fiji and Tonga), Mahogany (Fiji), Tamarind (Vanuatu) and participatory based reviews (Vanuatu).
As a consequence of these reviews, an initial four PARDI-funded research projects were commenced in late 2010 and early 2011. Collectively, PARDI now has project-based activities across all target Pacific countries (Fiji [3], Samoa [1], Tonga [3], Solomon Islands [1], Vanuatu [1] and Kiribati [1]). Project details below:
PRA 2010.01 - This James Cook University (JCU) led project is working to increase cultured pearl production capacity and improve quality in the Fiji and Tongan cultured pearl industries.
PRA 2010.02- This University of the South Pacific (USP) led project aims to evaluate and develop new value adding products and technologies for Tilapia and Caulerpa (seaweed spp.) for commercial application in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.
PRA 2010.04- This Southern Cross University (SCU) led project is undertaking a scoping study associated with the development of village-based training programmes and information sources for better postharvest handling and processing of sea cucumber in Fiji, Tonga and Kiribati.
PRA 2010.03 - A joint PARDI (Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) and ACIAR funded (PNG) project recently started, that aims to develop consumer-driven value-adding strategies and process techniques to support an emerging Canarium nut industry.
Supporting this portfolio are a series of ongoing small research activities (SRA) that include; consumer acceptance of the new taro cultivars, virgin coconut oil (VCO) chain assessment, PARDI Advisory Group operations, how best to create small-holder impacts from PARDI outputs, cocoa chain business case, and strategies for assessing and transferring capabilities.
The PARDI Advisory Group is currently reviewing a further five proposal, these include:
Creating export-orientated breadfruit production in Fiji
Producing high quality taro material in support of re-building Samoan taro exports
Premium market opportunities for smallholder cocoa producers in Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands
Understand the impacts of population dynamics on supply chains
Establishing a series of pilot scale participatory guarantee schemes for vegetables

Much of PARDI’s supply-chain driven research projects have only recently commenced. Consequently it is pre-mature to demonstrate research outputs and impacts. Preliminary project-specific activities include:

PRA 2010.01 (Pearls): Pearl farmers and market structure research has been completed for Tonga and Fiji, a project-funded staff (Jamie Whitford) appointed, and initial farmer training commenced. A full-time Fiji-based project scientist was appointed in May 2011.
PRA 2010.02 (value-adding fisheries) Desk-top studies for Fiji, Samoa & Tonga markets, and analysis of chains in Fiji and Samoa have been completed. Work is ongoing for Tonga outer island groups.
PRA 2010.04 (Sea cucumber): Supply and value chains in Fiji and Tonga have been documented. An evaluation of export chains for processed product from Pacific into Asian markets is anticipated shortly. Tonga and Kiribati field trips are ongoing
SRA 2010.01 (Taro consumer study): Taro sensory testing has been completed in Fiji and Auckland markets and a final report completed.

PARDI has completed three training and development initiatives in the Pacific, including a pearl farmer training workshop in Tonga (Nov 2010), survey training for USP students (Dec 2010), and value chain analysis teaching workshop, Vanuatu (May 2011). Further targeted training of fisheries staff is ongoing (PRA 2010.01 and PRA 2010.04).

To ensure effective project communication we have held six coordination workshops, prepared two six-monthly newsletters, and plan to shortly post PARDI research reports on SPC’s LRD website.

PARDI has participated in series meetings to establish close links with other current ACIAR and donor-funded activities in the region. Through the assistance of SPC and ACIAR, strong engagement with other ACIAR and EU-funded projects particularly in taro and cocoa are emerging; and with PHAMA in cocoa and canarium nut.
Finally, over the last 6 months the PARDI team has increased by 30 staff. There are presently 51 PARDI research staff; with the possibility of a further 19 staff dependant on the outcome of research proposals reviews.
To ensure pending commissioned projects have sufficient operational time, PARDI has requested and been granted a variation to extend the project completion date to January 2015.

PARDI conducts value chain analysis and research to strengthen selected value chains in Pacific horticulture, fisheries and forestry products. This year’s achievements include:
16 technical training workshops have been held.
28 industry and government stakeholders are receiving targeted capacity building and technical support.
17 higher degree students are linked to PARDI projects.
Three major consumer and market place studies have been undertaken:
1. Retail transformation market study - 1000 households in Fiji;
2. Consumer study for Canarium and chocolate products - 400 tourists in Vanuatu;
3. Study of teak supply capabilities in Solomon Islands and a global market analysis is well advanced.
Cocoa. Work has continued with cocoa value chain stakeholders in Vanuatu and the Solomon islands. The collaboration continues to expand to include the Vanuatu statistics office, two new chocolate importers, and PHAMA as well as facilitation for an annual Vanuatu Cocoa Industry Strategic Workshop.
Breadfruit. Research trials and infrastructure associated with the PARDI breadfruit project were severely impacted by flooding in early 2012. A large number (2000) root suckers and marcotts are now ready for field trials. SPC has released nearly 200 tissue-cultured trees. Three orchards have been established and a total of 350 trees planted.
Taro. CePaCT has continued working on taro virus indexing and elimination, in support of the Samoan taro-leaf-blight breeding program. Two virus-elimination methods have been selected, which have proven effective against some TaBV and DsMV infecting cycle-7 taro. Agronomic assessments are being undertaken monthly, with soil tests on selected parameters almost completed. Corms are being sequentially harvested to determine the optimum age for harvesting. A market-based consumer-acceptance study of selected varieties amongst Samoans living in Auckland, New Zealand, was recently completed.
Vegetables. This project seeks to improve smallholder vegetable farmers (Fiji and Solomon Islands) access to high-value domestic markets, through the development of participatory guarantee schemes (PGS). Two target resort partners and four core PGS grower groups have been identified. An industry stakeholder workshop was held in November 2012. An assessment of postharvest wastage has been undertaken. In the Solomon Islands, an audit of farm business management skills has been undertaken.
Protective cropping crops. This new project seeks to address poor product quality and short seasonality, through the development and application of protective cropping systems in Fiji and Samoa. A preliminary assessment of existing protective cropping infrastructure has been completed, with current effort focussed on establishing four trial sites.
Pearls. Development plans for pearl industries in Fiji and Tonga have been drafted. A national spat collection program was initiated in Fiji, in partnership with Fiji Fisheries. Spat collection equipment has been deployed to communities adjacent to pearl farms throughout the country, to provide an on-going supply of oysters for current pearl farms, thus addressing a key bottleneck for the industry. A series of capacity-building workshops have been held. A survey of the mother-of-pearl (MOP) handicraft industry in Fiji showed that this sector had an annual value of more than F$10 million of which more than 85% is based on MOP items imported from Asia.
Value-added fisheries products. Marketing strategy and market chains have been developed and tested for tilapia and Caulerpa (sea grapes). In Fiji a cold-chain HACCP analysis is needed for Caulerpa. The shelf-life of Caulerpa has been extended up to 12 days and a research partnership with the private sector is assessing how this can be incorporated into the supply chain (for the export market).
Tamarind. The value chain map has been completed. Research has demonstrated that a solar dryer was more efficient than passive sun drying for tamarind and that the fruit dries to a commercially acceptable water activity level after two days of fine weather in the solar dryer. Microbiological test results indicated that all samples met Australian food standards.
Canarium. The industry has increased since the start of the project with a private-sector partner now selling product in supermarkets and planning to triple production to 1.5 tonnes in the coming year. Research on tree selection has shown that the profitability of the industry could be greatly increased by selecting trees with large kernels and high kernel recovery.
Teak. The social research team visited collaborating villages in Solomon Islands to document areas of concern for growers. Grower and plantation operations were then assessed to identify market drivers for teak and their effect on grower participation.
PARDI publications, reports and newsletters are available online: http://www.spc.int/lrd

Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Australia
University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
James Cook University, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, Australia
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Land Resources Division, Fiji
University of the South Pacific, Faculty of Business and Economics, Fiji
Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Centre for Tropical Agriculture, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

Significant challenges face Pacific island countries (PICs) in improving livelihoods and overcoming poverty - in particular, food and fuel price surges in 2008, the impact of the global economic crisis, a number of natural disasters, difficulties maintaining infrastructure and the negative effects of climate change. PICs and international agencies acknowledge that the way to meet many of these challenges is to improve competitiveness of industries and thus provide a platform for stronger economic growth. This project will study issues particularly affecting food production and agricultural sector development. These include isolation from key growth markets and limited coordination of supply chains. There is a growing presence of internationally supported economic development programs that address some of these issues in the region; this project, involving ACIAR’s Pacific Agribusiness Research for Development Initiative (PARDI), will complement that work with a focus on research for development to underpin the competitiveness of targeted high-value agriculture, fisheries and forestry products.

Project Budget
$9,991,706.00
Grant Report Value
$10990877
Grant Report Recipient
University of Queensland
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
4068
Grant Report Finish Date
31/01/2015
Grant Report Start Date
05/02/2010

Building a resilient mango industry in Cambodia and Australia through improved production and supply chain practices

Project Leader
Mr Mark Hickey
Email
mark.hickey@dpi.nsw.gov.au
Fax
02 6628 1744
Phone
02 6626 1277
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
HORT/2012/003
Start Date
01/09/2013
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
BR-200901-51479
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/04/2017
Commissioned Organisation: 
Department of Primary Industries, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
Department of Primary Industries, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, Australia
  • Cambodia Agricultural Research and Development Institute, Cambodia
  • General Directorate of Agriculture, Cambodia
  • Royal University of Agriculture, Cambodia
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Richard Markham
Collaborating Institutions
Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, Australia
Cambodia Agricultural Research and Development Institute, Cambodia
General Directorate of Agriculture, Cambodia
Royal University of Agriculture, Cambodia
University of Adelaide, Australia
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

Mango is currently Cambodia’s second most important fruit crop. The Royal Government of Cambodia intends to expand the domestic and export opportunities for mangoes. To enable Cambodia to compete at an international level, improvements need to be made across the whole production/market continuum, particularly to meet phytosanitary requirements. The project’s objectives are fourfold: to develop and evaluate integrated crop management strategies; identify and prioritise key supply chain constraints including postharvest losses, packaging, storage and transport; design and implement a pathway to adoption of improved management options; and build capacity of the Cambodian research, development and extension system. Outputs will include a variety of best-practice workshops and training resources, pest surveys, disease-free plant nurseries, safe pesticide techniques and a supply chain evaluation report. A separate component of research in Australia will examine the manipulation of fruit maturity and the biocontrol of a major pest, the fruitspotting bug. Lessons learned from each component will be applicable to the mango industry in both countries.

Project Budget
$1,108,449.00
Grant Report Value
$1219294
Grant Report Recipient
Department of Primary Industries
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
2477
Grant Report Finish Date
30/04/2017
Grant Report Start Date
03/07/2013

Pilot testing of the Chameleon sensor

Project Leader
Dr Richard Stirzaker
Email
richard.stirzaker@csiro.au
Fax
Phone
02 6246 5570
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
LWR/2014/029
Start Date
01/06/2014
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
TG-202105-36058
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/05/2015
Commissioned Organisation: 
CSIRO Land and Water, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
CSIRO Land and Water, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Measurement Engineering Australia Pty Ltd, Australia
  • Murdoch University, Australia
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • Charles Sturt University, Australia
  • University of Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Evan Christen
Collaborating Institutions
Measurement Engineering Australia Pty Ltd, Australia
Murdoch University, Australia
University of Adelaide, Australia
Charles Sturt University, Australia
University of Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique
Program Areas
Project Budget
$85,000.00
Grant Report Value
$93500
Grant Report Recipient
CSIRO Land and Water
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
2601
Grant Report Finish Date
31/05/2015

Increasing productivity of legume-based farming systems in the central dry zone of Burma

Project Leader
Dr David Herridge
Email
david.herridge@industry.nsw.gov.au
Fax
02 6763 1222
Phone
02 6766 4504
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
SMCN/2011/047
Start Date
12/12/2013
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
ML-202311-46886
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/06/2016
Extension Start Date
01/07/2016
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of New England, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
University of New England, Australia
Extension Finish Date
30/06/2017
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics, India
  • Department of Agricultural Research, Myanmar
  • Department of Agriculture, Myanmar
  • Yezin Agricultural University, Myanmar
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Robert Edis
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

This project is one of five components of a multi-sector program, funded by AusAID and managed by ACIAR, to improve food security and small-holder farmer livelihoods in the Central Dry Zone (CDZ) and Ayeyarwady Delta of Myanmar. The program is focussed on rice, legume-based systems, livestock and fisheries with an overarching socio-economic/extension component.
The specific objectives of this legume-based systems project, involving personnel from the Department of Agricultural Research (DAR), Department of Agriculture (DoA) and Yezin Agricultural University (YAU) in Myanmar, from the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India, and from the University of New England (UNE) and University of Adelaide (UA) in Australia are to:
Develop new, high-yielding varieties of pigeonpea, groundnut, chickpea, green and black gram through genetic improvement with emphasis on resistance/tolerance to biotic stresses to link with institutional and community-based seed production and distribution.
Improve nutrient management of the legume-based farming systems, particularly phosphorus (P), nitrogen (N), boron (B), sulphur (S), potassium (K) and zinc (Zn), using both mineral and organic sources, including rhizobial inoculants.
Improve the agronomic management of the legume-based systems through crop benchmarking with farmers to increase efficiency of water use and effectively integrate new high-yielding varieties and pest, disease and nutrient management.
Enhance capacity for RD&E in the relevant agencies in Myanmar through effective implementation of the collaborative ACIAR project model and through targeted training, extension and capacity building activities.
The geographic foci of the legume project are the Nay Pyi Taw, Mandalay, Sagaing and Magway Divisions of the CDZ with linkages to ACIAR/AusAID project on rice production in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Bago Divisions (SMCN/2011/046). About 2 million ha of chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut are grown in the CDZ annually producing 2-3 million tonne grain worth A$600-900 million. Other crops in the rotations, including rice, green gram, maize, millet and sesame, add to the gross value of production (to an estimated A$1.5 billion). The potential economic impact of the proposed project, linked to adoption of new varieties and technologies, is A$30 million annually. More long-term potential impacts through capacity building at DAR, YAU and DoA are more difficult to quantify in economic terms but may be substantial. Social and environmental impacts of the project are likely to be positive. The project’s methodology will follow the ACIAR model of collaborative RD&E with much of the research done on-farm with farmer involvement. There will be explicit linkages to both government (e.g. DoA) and NGO extension & technology transfer programs (e.g. LIFT), to the socioeconomic/extension project ASEM/2011/043 and SMCN/2011/046 (rice project) and a focus on post-graduate and short-term training.
Implementation of the multi-sector program including this project (SMCN-2011-047) has been extremely difficult. Commencement date of the program was originally set at 01 July 2011, to be completed by 30 June 2015. Because of difficulties with visas for scoping missions and the delays that this caused, the program commencement was reset to July 2012 to terminate in June 2016. Since then, difficulties in realising sign-off of the MOUs, the lengthy approval processes in both Myanmar and Australia have resulted in further delays. The fisheries and livestock projects associated with the Ministry of Livestock & Fisheries in Myanmar were finally singed off during the early part of 2013.
By the end of August 2013, all approvals were received for the MOU covering the rice, legumes and extension projects under the Ministry of Agriculture & Irrigation (MOAI). The MOU was finally signed off at DAR, Yezin, on 29th November 2013, facilitating the release of SMCN-2011-047 project funds by ACIAR to UNE in December 2013. Variation 1 of the SMCN-2011-047 Project Proposal and Budget was submitted to ACIAR in late December 2013/early January 2014 to account for changes in personnel and dates of activities as well as changes in budget expenditure by the Australian institutions on behalf of DAR. These changes necessitated a fresh round of approvals of project documents by all institutions, which was finalised during February/March 2014.
We are currently waiting for the relevant Ministry approvals for DAR, DoA and YAU to set up foreign currency accounts with banks in Nay Pyi Taw to receive project funds. Submissions for the approvals have been in the Myanmar system for more than 2 months now. Until the approvals to come through, project funds cannot be transferred to the three institutions in Myanmar. Project funds have been dispersed as per the contractual arrangements to ICRISAT and the University of Adelaide.
In spite of these problems, there have been significant activities during the period July 2012 to April 2014 and progress towards project goals has been achieved. These included:
Five site visits by Australian project scientists to Myanmar in November 2012, February 2013, August 2013, November 2013 and February 2014 (total of 19 person visits)
Three site visits by ICRISAT project scientists to Myanmar in November 2012, February 2013 and November 2013 (total of 9 person visits).
Travel by Dr Su Su Win, DAR, to Australia and New Zealand in April 2013 for laboratory training at the UNE soils laboratory and participation by Dr Su Su Win and Chris Guppy in the 13th International Soil Science and Plant Analysis Conference, NZ.
Key activities during the visits and travel were:
o a participatory rural appraisal (PRA) involving a survey of 259 farmers across the CDZ (November 2012)
o inception workshop for the legume program involving all project scientists from Australia, ICRISAT and the three institutions in Myanmar (November 2012)
o whole-of-program inception workshop in Yangon (November 2012)
o two soil water workshops in Yezin and Magway (February 2013)
o three lectures at YAU (February 2013)
o one lecture at YAU on IPM (November 2013) by ICRISAT scientist
o work-plan development of legume crops in consultation with DAR & DoA for 2014
o whole-of-program M&E workshop in Yezin (March 2013)
o seminar for 100 attendees on R&D at DAR, Yezin (August 2013)
o participation in the ADB Myanmar Policy Forum on Myanmar’s seed industry (August 2013)
o whole-of-program annual review in Ngwe Saung (November 2013)
o three nutrient management workshops in Nyaung Oo, Magway and Yezin (November 2013)
o on-site 13-day training for the soil chemistry group at DAR Yezin in analytical techniques by Ms Gabrielle Ray, UNE (February 2014)
o project review, discussion and planning conducted during all project travel.

Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics, India
Department of Agricultural Research, Myanmar
Department of Agriculture, Myanmar
Yezin Agricultural University, Myanmar
Overview Objectives

Providing smallholder farmers in Myanmar with the means of increasing agricultural productivity is an effective short-term option to address the country’s issues of poverty alleviation and food security. With a geographic focus on Myanmar’s central dry zone (CDZ), this project will build on the outcomes of a previous ACIAR-funded project (SMCN/2006/013). It seeks to develop new, high-yielding varieties of pigeonpea, groundnut (peanut) and chickpea, and to improve nutrient management and agronomic management of the legume-based farming systems. It will also enhance the capacity for RD&E in the relevant agencies in Myanmar, through implementation of the collaborative ACIAR project model and through targeted training, extension and capacity building programs.

Project Budget
$2,000,000.00
Grant Report Value
$2200000
Grant Report Recipient
University of New England
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
2351
Grant Report Finish Date
30/06/2017
Grant Report Start Date
08/08/2012

Sustainable management practices for profitable crop livestock systems for Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR

Project Leader
Dr Matthew Denton
Email
matthew.denton@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
08 83037109
Phone
08 83131098
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
SMCN/2014/014
Start Date
17/06/2014
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
ML-201002-47348
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/12/2014
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Murdoch University, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Robert Edis
Collaborating Institutions
Murdoch University, School of Environmental Science, Australia
Project Budget
$85,525.00
Grant Report Value
$94078
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5064
Grant Report Finish Date
31/12/2014

Evaluation of opportunities to enhance food and nutritional security in Kiribati and Tuvalu

Project Leader
Dr Graham Lyons
Email
graham.lyons@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
08 8303 7109
Phone
08 8303 6533
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
SMCN/2014/021
Australian Partner
Start Date
10/06/2014
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
JH-201702-89494
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/11/2014
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
  • Ministry of Natural Resources and Lands, Tuvalu
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Robert Edis
Collaborating Institutions
Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
Ministry of Natural Resources and Lands, Tuvalu
Project Budget
$74,930.00
Grant Report Value
$82423
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5064
Grant Report Finish Date
30/11/2014

Pages