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Impact assessment of cocoa interventions in Vanuatu

Project Leader
Dr Alexandra Peralta
Email
alexandra.peralta@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
+61 (0)8 8313 1783
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2016/053
Australian Partner
Start Date
22/11/2016
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RG-202909-53598
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
31/08/2017
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
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Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Centre for Global Food and Resources (GFAR), Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • Alternative Communities Trade in Vanuatu, Vanuatu
  • FAO, Fiji
  • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Rodd Dyer
Collaborating Institutions
Alternative Communities Trade in Vanuatu, Vanuatu
FAO, Fiji
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
Program Areas
Project Budget
$88,600.00
Grant Report Value
$97460
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5005
Grant Report Finish Date
31/08/2017

Improving soil health, agricultural productivity and food security on atolls

Project Leader
Mr Siosiua Halavatau
Email
siosiuah@spc.int
Fax
679 3370021
Phone
679 3370733 ext 35294
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
SMCN/2014/089
Start Date
01/10/2015
Project Coordinator Fax
Reference Number
ML-201509-32993
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/04/2019
Commissioned Organisation: 
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
Commissioned Organisation
Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
  • Department of Agriculture, Tuvalu
  • University of Tasmania, Australia
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Robert Edis
Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati
Department of Agriculture, Tuvalu
University of Tasmania, Australia
Overview Objectives

Diets in Kiribati and Tuvalu have traditionally been based on fish and other marine animals and heavy on starch (giant swamp taro and breadfruit), with some fruits but few vegetables. Agricultural production in both countries is restricted by lack of seeds, water shortages and salinity, poor soils, and lack of tools and knowledge of farming practices, and limited guidance from extension services. As a result of limited agricultural production, Kiribati and Tuvalu consume more than they produce.

The research proposed is associated with three ACIAR projects; Leafy vegetable scoping study PC/2010/063 in Samoa, Solomon Islands; the Soil Health project SMCN/2009/003 based in Fiji, Samoa and Kiribati; and the scoping study SMCN/2014/021 “Evaluation of opportunities to enhance food and nutritional security in Kiribati and Tuvalu” which recommended suitable food crops for atolls and a strategy for this project.

This project contributes to the development goal of improving the food and nutritional security of communities living on atoll islands in the Pacific. The project also contributes to the three main research priority themes for the region (ACIAR AOP 2014-15): food and nutritional security; agriculture, fisheries and forestry resource management and development; and agriculture, fisheries and forestry value chains. The specific aim of the project is to improve the livelihoods of the people of coral atolls, Kiribati and Tuvalu in particular, through increased and diversified agricultural production.

Project Budget
$1,030,589.00
Grant Report Value
$1133648
Grant Report Recipient
Secretariat of the Pacific Community
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
Grant Report Finish Date
30/04/2019

Enhancing private sector-led development of the Canarium nut industry in Papua New Guinea

Project Leader
Professor Helen Wallace
Email
hwallace@usc.edu.au
Fax
07 5430 2881
Phone
07 5430 1228
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project Coordinator Phone
0419 496 579
02 6217 0549
Project ID: 
FST/2014/099
Start Date
25/06/2015
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
SB-201212-38261
Project Type
Bilateral
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/06/2018
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
dockey
Project Coordinator Email
bartlett@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Mr Tony Bartlett
Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

This project seeks to increase commercial processing and expand markets for canarium nuts in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. This project is trialling a range of interventions to reach this goal including market research, technical advice, capacity building, business mentoring and access to infrastructure for both private and public sector stakeholders.
There are four objectives:
1. Assess the needs of the private sector to participate in the canarium industry
2. Develop and undertake research-based interventions that address the needs of the private sector including smallholders, small scale entrepreneurs (especially women) SMEs, and large scale processors
3. Develop an appropriate commercial model for a medium scale value adding factory for the canarium industry
4. Create a model for public- private partnerships in the canarium industry in PNG

The major activities and outputs to date are as follows:
Interviews with smallholders and young people, market stallholders, industry representatives, Women and Youth in Agriculture (WYIA) network and government staff have been conducted. Barriers to upscaling the sale and processing of nuts include farmers’ knowledge of supply chains and optimising production. Extension requirements of these groups will be further identified and will explore opportunities to engage their young people.
New market opportunities, particularly those in Port Moresby have been assessed, with a formal launch in Port Moresby planned for 2017. Relationships with a number of key buyers have been developed and a number of new product propositions have been discussed.
Solar drying has been identified as a method that can enable small scale processors to add value and increase participation in the canarium industry.
A solar drying training workshop was developed by the project team and delivered in 2015. It was attended by 22 women and youth from the East New Britain Women and Youth in Agriculture association.
A number of studies have been conducted on nut quality, processing and storage systems. Key findings are: o Kernels of purple fruits contained significantly higher calcium, iron and zinc compared to those of green fruits
Keeping the testa on during storage may slow down the autoxidation and prevent rancidity of the kernels.
Short term storage of nuts in freezer results in lower Free Fatty Acid composition.
An assessment of soil nutrients in cocoa canarium cropping systems compared to cocoa Gliricidia cropping systems has found no differences between canarium and Gliricidia when trees were spaced at 8m X 16m. Some differences were found at an 8 X8 tree spacing. Canarium kernel protein content did not differ in different tree spacings.
One of the several mechanical crackers investigated shows promise. The Jessie roller cracker has the capacity to crack twenty times the current factory capacity with half the required staff. This will be tested further in the coming years

This project to date has increased market opportunities on a pilot scale for canarium growers in the Gazelle peninsula of ENB. More than 11 tonnes of nut in pulp were purchased by the NARI factory compared to 5 tonnes in the previous year, with a price of between 50 toea and 1 kina per kg- this represents additional income for canarium growers. A major milestone for the project is that NARI is participating in buying and selling canarium nut in a formal commercial process in East New Britain province. The staff at NARI have commenced selling dried and packaged nuts into the local retail supermarket and to several wholesalers, and demand is strong. Sales of canarium nut product to commercial retail outlets is a first for PNG. The factory successfully bought and processed 11.52 tonnes nut-in-pulp resulting in 263.6 kg kernel being processed. The volumes sold have to date generated 7000 kina for the pilot processing factory. An additional 243kg Kernel - in - Testa is still to be processed.

NARI staff are developing commercial skills in production, packaging, distribution, sales and marketing by selling canarium products into local markets. Various equipment (e.g. refrigerated container, oven moisture meter and weather station) has been supplied to increase capacity and in some instances dramatically increased operating efficiency of the canarium factory. A refrigerated container for storage will enable large volumes of nuts to be purchased. The fan forced dehydrating oven will more than double the volume of kernels that can be dried at once. TJ’s nutcrackers and fans for the solar dryers have increased availability for ENB WYiA to participate in value adding on a local level.

Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
Program Areas
Overview Objectives

FST/2014/099: Enhancing private sector-led development of the Canarium nut industry in Papua New Guinea

Nuts have huge potential to improve the livelihood of the rural poor in developing countries and meet the Millennium Development Goal to eradicate poverty and hunger. Nuts have excellent nutritional value, can be stored for long periods and can be sold for cash, processed and exported to distant markets. Canarium indicum is an agroforestry tree in Eastern Indonesia and the Pacific that produces edible nuts and has been the focus of efforts by donor agencies to commercialize the industry in PNG and the Pacific.
This project seeks to expand markets and processing of canarium nuts in East New Britain, by strengthening private sector capacity and engagement using nuts from existing trees. Women conduct the majority of canarium nut growing and trading activities, including: nut cultivation, harvesting, processing and selling.
The project will take a whole of value-chain approach, and offer a range of interventions such as market research, technical advice, capacity building, business mentoring and access to infrastructure for both private and public sector stakeholders. The private sector will be targeted at 3 different scales: smallholder and small scale entrepreneurs, SMEs, and large scale processors. This in one of 5 projects in the TADEP program which aims to foster private sector led development in agriculture, increase agricultural productive capacity and improve access to markets for farmers in Papua New Guinea and Bougainville, particularly women farmers.

Project Budget
$3,519,080.00
Grant Report Value
$3870988
Grant Report Recipient
University of the Sunshine Coast
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
4558
Grant Report Finish Date
30/06/2018
Grant Report Start Date
16/06/2015

Developing a sustainable business model for upscaling the Agribusiness master class

Project Leader
Dr Suzie Newman
Email
suzie.newman@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
Phone
Mob: +61 421 910761
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2015/030
Australian Partner
Start Date
20/06/2015
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RW-202805-32736
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
30/06/2016
Extension Start Date
01/07/2016
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
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Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Global Food Studies, Australia
Extension Finish Date
31/05/2017
Overview Collaborators
  • University of Adelaide, Australia
  • Centre for Rural Economy Development, Burma
ACIAR Research Program Manager
Dr Rodd Dyer
Collaborating Institutions
University of Adelaide, Australia
Centre for Rural Economy Development, Burma
Program Areas
Project Budget
$101,750.00
Grant Report Value
$111925
Grant Report Recipient
University of Adelaide
Grant Report Recipient Post Code
5001
Grant Report Finish Date
31/05/2017
Grant Report Start Date
11/06/2015

A strategic approach to pro-poor consumer research in the Mekong region - extended analyses

Project Leader
Dr Wendy Umberger
Email
wendy.umberger@adelaide.edu.au
Fax
08 8303 7109
Phone
08 8313 6765
Project Country
Inactive project countries
Project ID: 
AGB/2015/029
Australian Partner
Start Date
09/06/2015
Project Coordinator Fax
02 6217 0501
Reference Number
RW-202605-31713
Project Type
Other
Project Status
Active
Finish Date
15/06/2016
Extension Start Date
16/06/2016
Commissioned Organisation: 
University of Adelaide, Australia
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Project Coordinator Email
rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
Commissioned Organisation
University of Adelaide, Faculty of the Professions, Australia
Extension Finish Date
31/12/2016
Overview Collaborators
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Rodd Dyer
    Program Areas
    Project Budget
    $100,690.00
    Grant Report Value
    $110759
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of Adelaide
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    5005
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/12/2016

    Improving returns from community teak plantings in Solomon Islands

    Project Leader
    Dr Tim Blumfield
    Email
    t.blumfield@griffith.edu.au
    Fax
    Phone
    07 3735 6709
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project Coordinator Phone
    0419 496 579
    02 6217 0549
    Project ID: 
    FST/2014/066
    Start Date
    01/07/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    SB-200707-61568
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2019
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    Griffith University, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    bartlett@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    Griffith University, Enrionmental Futures Centre, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • SPE Consulting, Solomon Islands
    • Solomon Islands Government, Ministry of Forestry, Solomon Islands
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Mr Tony Bartlett
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    The project was established to explore the possibilities of milling and drying teak in the plantations, thereby making it more easily and cost effectively transportable to a woodyard where it would be prepared for export. This meant finding a highly portable milling system and developing the protocols for managing the timber. The choice of truly portable mills is very limited. In developed countries, portable is equal to towable or at least capable of being transported via truck. In Solomon Islands terms, any equipment must be capable of being transported by small open boat and then carried to the site often over steep and difficult terrain. After an extensive search of all available options on the internet, the most suitable model was identified and following a day of testing in Australia was purchased for the trial. The model chosen was a chainsaw mill as chainsaws are readily understood technology and commonplace in Solomon Islands. Other models of mills, which are generally quite heavy, have either a circular blade that usually swings through 90 degrees to cut both depth and width, or a bandsaw blade.
    Initial results are good with the mill producing high quality, accurately dimensioned, square billets (timber that has been sawn on all 4 sides at a maximum size and that can be re-sawn later). The frame of the mill is light enough for 2 people to carry though all the extra equipment, chainsaws and winches, as well as supplies for the day still make this heavy work requiring a number of people. Once established on-site, the mill frame is left in place until milling ceases but other equipment such as winches and chainsaws are secured in a house belonging to a village elder or chief when the crew are absent.
    As with the development of any novel system, there have been teething problems, mainly to do with equipment and maintenance, but these are being resolved as they occur and it is anticipated that the mill should be able to produce 2 cubic metres of sawn timber per week. The primary stage of drying the milled timber occurs in the plantation as the green timber is still too heavy to carry any distance. The timber milled thus far has been carefully stacked in layers by size with spacers equally and regularly placed between the layers to facilitate drying without warping. A cover to provide shade has been has made from the off cut sections of the logs. It is anticipated that the timber will dry for at least 2 months before transport, but this will be dependent upon the moisture testing that is taking place monthly. Further testing of the mill will proceed over the rest of the year and the team are also looking at the various options for testing other mills that may not be as lightweight as the current model but capable of greater productivity. It may be that these mills will have a role to play in areas where access to the plantation is not difficult.
    The project has been keenly aware of the need to establish a full chain of custody for the timber in order to fulfil any future requirements regarding legality. The project is in the process of obtaining a milling licence from the Solomon Islands Government and established a recording protocol that exceeds current requirements demanded by the Australian and New Zealand governments. Each piece of timber produced will be capable of tracing back to the plot it was harvested from and the owner of the tree.
    The research into the impact of the introduction of these technologies and the potential for income generation has begun. A series of village visits has been undertaken by the project social team and a questionnaire has been handed out to the communities involved so that they have a chance to discuss the questions amongst themselves prior to the next visit. Initial consultations with local exporters have also taken place and, as the nature and quality of the product of the mill become apparent, these discussions will more tightly focus on eventual markets for the timber that has been milled.
    In the two visits to Munda since November 2015, the social and economic community impact team has visited all of the six communities (at least once) that will be the main study focus for the project. This has included overnight stays. The team has made substantial progress in terms of building familiarity, trust and goodwill, and also in terms of our understanding of the specific conditions, customs and meanings of the individual communities. The main community impact team activities with the six villages have been centred upon discussions about: the purpose and intent of the community impact research of the project; building awareness about relevant social and economic factors associated with the project and aspects that the community would like to be considered in the study. The visits also provided additional information about the nature of the trial programs and attempted to enhance an integrated community understanding of the project goals.

    Collaborating Institutions
    Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    SPE Consulting, Solomon Islands
    Solomon Islands Government, Ministry of Forestry, Solomon Islands
    Southern Cross University, Australia
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    FST/2014/066: Improving returns from community teak plantings in Solomon Islands

    A recent inventory by the Ministry of Forestry has estimated that there are currently (2014) 15,000 ha of plantations owned by 21,000 separate groups or individual growers in the Solomon Islands. Many of these were planted in the period 1995 -2000 and now these plantations are in need of either thinning or clear-felling. While the quality of the timber is good, the poor form of many trees is such that most cannot be sold commercially as round logs, which are also difficult to transport to the nearest port. In Cape York Peninsula, where sandalwood occurs naturally, there are often limited options for commercial development, but initial research under FST/2008/010 showed that forestry provides one of the few promising opportunities.
    The project aims to develop a practical model suited to Small Island States that enables existing small scale teak plantations to be utilised and provides growers with good returns. This will be achieved by developing strategies that will allow growers to maximise the volume of timber that can be obtained from their plantations.
    Turning moribund plantations into economic opportunities will assist communities to realise there are opportunities for sustainable income from plantations. Women in particular may benefit from developing secondary drying as a business opportunity. The environmental benefits will be realised through an increase in the area of degraded secondary forest which is brought back into productive forest management to provide timber for local processing and sale in the future.

    Project Budget
    $1,199,998.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1319998
    Grant Report Recipient
    Griffith University
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4111
    Grant Report Finish Date
    30/06/2019
    Grant Report Start Date
    17/05/2015

    Enhancing value added products and environmental benefits from agroforestry systems in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific

    Project Leader
    Professor Helen Wallace
    Email
    hwallace@usc.edu.au
    Fax
    07 5430 2881
    Phone
    07 5430 1228
    Inactive project countries
    Project Coordinator Phone
    0419 496 579
    02 6217 0549
    Project ID: 
    FST/2014/067
    Start Date
    01/10/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    SB-200807-40844
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    31/07/2019
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    bartlett@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of the Sunshine Coast, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    • Southern Cross University, Australia
    • Ministry of Trade, Commerce, Industry and Tourism, Vanuatu
    • National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    • Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    • Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labour and Immigration, Solomon Islands
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Mr Tony Bartlett
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    Approximately 80% of people in PNG and the Pacific Islands live in rural areas and earn their livelihoods from agriculture, fishing and forestry. Rural farmers generally have limited markets for their produce, and little access to distant markets. Processing and value-adding can enhance market access, especially if products can be processed locally and transported to distant markets or central distributors.
    Agroforestry tree species are widely grown in the Pacific Islands and provide multiple products such as food, timber and many other products. Agroforestry trees provide ecosystem services including soil protection, enhanced biodiversity and help to reduce the severe impacts of climate change. There is great potential to value-add to primary products from agroforestry crops in Pacific countries. However, a market- driven approach is needed to identify the best opportunities for value-added products from agroforestry crops. In addition, agroforestry crops, especially tree crops may take several years to produce marketable products and smallholders need incentives in the short term to encourage investment in tree crops. Tree crops can be integrated into agroforestry systems with other short term crops such as taro, sweet potato and banana to produce a return on investment more quickly. However, there is little information on the performance of these integrated agroforestry systems in terms of the best species selection, crop production, and economic and environmental benefits to smallholders.
    This project explores opportunities for new value-added agroforestry products to improve livelihoods in PNG, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. This research is identifying the best opportunities for value-adding, and researching value-adding techniques for these products. We are also investigating integrated agroforestry systems in Fiji and Vanuatu that are likely to have environmental benefits such as catchment revegetation along with economic returns to smallholders.
    Objectives
    Identify multipurpose agroforestry crops with market potential to be value-added in all four countries
    Develop techniques and enhance small to medium enterprises ability to participate in value-adding
    Enable enhanced and gender equitable smallholder participation in agroforestry crop production
    Develop and pilot test catchment revegetation systems linked to markets
    Build capacity and disseminate research findings
    Activities and outputs to date:
    Inventories, reviews and key informant interviews have commenced in all countries to determine key opportunities for value adding to agroforestry crops
    A spreadsheet of agroforestry opportunities and key criteria for selection across the 4 countries has been developed. These have been modified through consultation with key public and private sector stakeholders in each of the 4 countries.
    We are working with newly formed women’s groups in Vanuatu and Fiji to develop strategies to increase income opportunities
    13 potential sites have been identified in Fiji and Vanuatu where pilot agroforestry sites could be established
    Tourism industries stakeholders (Shangri La Resort, Warwick, P&O) have been identified that are keen to collaborate on catchment rehabilitation and supply of traditional food crop between smallholders and the tourism industry.
    Participatory Impact Pathway Monitoring and Evaluation Plan has been developed

    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Southern Cross University, Australia
    Ministry of Trade, Commerce, Industry and Tourism, Vanuatu
    National Agricultural Research Institute, Papua New Guinea
    Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Fiji
    Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labour and Immigration, Solomon Islands
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    Approximately 80% of people in PNG and the Pacific Islands live in rural areas and earn their livelihoods from agriculture, fishing and forestry. More than 90 % of rural people are semi-subsistence smallholder farmers and women are often primarily responsible for farming activities. Rural farmers generally have limited markets for their produce, and little access to distant markets. Processing and value-adding can enhance market access, especially if products can be processed locally and transported to distant markets or central distributors.

    Agroforestry tree species are widely grown in the Pacific Islands and provide multiple products such as food, timber and a vast array of NWFPs as well as ecosystem services including soil protection, enhanced biodiversity and climate change adaptation and mitigation. There is great potential to value-add to primary products from agroforestry crops in Pacific countries. Industries based on value-added product can also create employment and enhance business opportunities for small- to- medium enterprises. However, a market- driven approach is needed to identify the best opportunities for value-added products from agroforestry crops.

    This project will explore opportunities for new value-added agroforestry products to improve livelihoods in PNG, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. This research will identify the best opportunities for value-adding, and research value-adding techniques for these products.

    Project Budget
    $2,416,941.00
    Grant Report Value
    $2658635
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of the Sunshine Coast
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    4558
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/07/2019
    Grant Report Start Date
    08/09/2015

    Improving smallholder incomes in the north-western highlands of Vietnam by increasing access and competitiveness in regional temperate and subtropical fruit markets

    Project Leader
    Mr Oleg Nicetic
    Email
    o.nicetic1@uq.edu.au
    Fax
    Phone
    +61 2 4708 0895
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    AGB/2012/060
    Start Date
    01/07/2014
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    TA-200208-88378
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    30/06/2018
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of Queensland, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of Queensland, School of Journalism and Communication, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Fruit and Vegetable Research Institute, Vietnam
    • Hanoi Agricultural University, Vietnam
    • Plant Protection Research Institute, Vietnam
    • Center for Agrarian Systems Research and Development, Vietnam
    • Plant Protection sub-Department Lao Cai, Vietnam
    • Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Science Institute, Vietnam
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Rodd Dyer
    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Fruit and Vegetable Research Institute, Vietnam
    Hanoi Agricultural University, Vietnam
    Plant Protection Research Institute, Vietnam
    Center for Agrarian Systems Research and Development, Vietnam
    Plant Protection sub-Department Lao Cai, Vietnam
    Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Science Institute, Vietnam
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    The North West is the poorest region in Vietnam, with Lai Chau, Son La and Lao Cai provinces ranking 1st, 3rd and 4th in terms of poverty rates. The Vietnamese Government invested considerable effort and resources, especially during the 1990s in the development of temperate fruit production in the NW highlands. Government investment in the new plantings was well supported by local People’s Committees, leading to a significant expansion of production areas of Tam Hoa plum, which peaked in the early 2000s. These have since contracted due to falling prices following a major increase in the supply of Tam Hoa plum and increased availability of other competing fruits from Vietnam and countries such as China in urban markets.
    This project aims to evaluate consumer and market dynamics, support government-led planning, coordination and development, overcome barriers to adoption of improved varieties and cultivation techniques and develop competitive consumer-driven value chain and marketing models for engagement with more profitable markets.
    This project has been designed in close cooperation with the ACIAR project AGB/2012/059 “Towards more profitable and sustainable vegetable farming systems in north-western Vietnam” and will address recommendations from the review of ACIAR projects AGB/2002/086 -Improving postharvest quality of temperate fruits in Vietnam and Australia.

    Project Budget
    $1,399,959.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1539955
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of Queensland
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    3072
    Grant Report Finish Date
    30/06/2018
    Grant Report Start Date
    25/06/2014

    High quality markets and value chains for small-scale and emerging beef cattle farmers in South Africa

    Project Leader
    Dr Garry Griffith
    Email
    ggriffit@une.edu.au
    Fax
    02 6773 3596
    Phone
    02 6773 4085
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    LPS/2005/128
    Start Date
    02/02/2015
    Project Coordinator Fax
    Reference Number
    CH-202311-53389
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    10/03/2016
    Extension Start Date
    11/03/2016
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of New England, Australia
    dockey
    Project Coordinator Email
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of New England, Australia
    Extension Finish Date
    31/12/2017
    Overview Collaborators
    • University of Adelaide, Australia
    • Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
    • National Agricultural Marketing Council, South Africa
    • Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, South Africa
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Peter Horne
    Progress Reports (Year 1, 2, 3 etc)

    Year 1 (1 April 2015 - 30 June 2016)
    Good progress has been made in this project since it commenced on 1 April 2015. Most project milestones and objectives are on track and the project team is confident that proof-of-concept of linking smallholder farmers with high value free-range markets will be realised in at least one, possibly two, beef value chains by the end of 2016.
    Woolworths - Cradock Abattoir value chain
    Woolworths is aiming to develop a free-range line of beef derived from cattle from the project’s smallholder farmers in conjunction with Cradock Abattoir in the Eastern Cape. Over time the alliance is targeting an additional 200 head of cattle per week from the project’s smallholder farmers.
    Animals that do not fall within Woolworths’ “steak” specifications will still be accepted from the project’s small-scale farmers but they will be used for other purposes e.g. the free-range branded biltong, pies or mince markets. Farmers will be paid for compliance with specifications. Cattle that do not comply with “steak” specifications will receive lower prices whilst all other carcasses (A-B4 age) with the correct fat and weight specifications will receive A-class grain fed prices.
    The biggest challenge in supplying free-range animals is for farmers to deliver consistent numbers of animals within market specifications throughout the year. This problem is exacerbated with the ongoing severe drought conditions in South Africa. Hence this value chain has contracted with smallholder farmers who recently acquired irrigation farms in a 50 km radius of Cradock to use irrigated pastures to finish animals sourced from other smallholder farmers within a broader 250 km radius of Cradock, thereby securing a consistent flow of cattle, cash flow to participating farmers and more animals within market specifications. Those irrigation farmers will finish animals to a finished weight by 36 months of age, with targeted growth rates of 1.3 kg per day. The project is also testing the cost-effectiveness of growth rates on irrigated pastures vs. dryland pastures with nutritional supplementation through this value chain.
    Efforts are now underway to source cattle from farmers within a 250 km radius of Cradock Abattoir to allow the first testing of animals for adherence to market specifications.
    Training of the project’s value chain support team in the Eastern Cape has been completed and training of the smallholder farmers is underway.
    Pick ‘n Pay - Cavalier Meats value chain
    Cavalier Meats is the processor of free-range beef for Pick ‘n Pay and it receives carcasses from contracted abattoirs for that purpose. Currently no cattle from small-scale farmers go through those contracted abattoirs. However Cavalier is building its own abattoir at Cullinan in Gauteng to supply the Cavalier brand. The new facility will commence operations in August 2016 and will focus on free-range beef. It will also accept cattle from small-scale farmers.
    Work is now underway to identify cattle from Gauteng that would be suitable for Pick ‘n Pay’s specifications, with the aim of slaughtering them at the ARC’s research abattoir at Irene to evaluate their suitability in conjunction with Pick ‘n Pay and Cavalier. Work is also underway to engage and train smallholder farmers and value chain support teams within a 250 km radius of Cullinan so they are able to engage with this value chain once the abattoir becomes operational.
    Massmart
    In late March 2016, Massmart advised that it had made a business-level decision to move away from smallholder enterprise development based on agricultural products. Their correspondence indicates that price volatility and the uncertainty around supply and quality make this the hardest space of all in which they can succeed, particularly in times of extended drought as is the current situation across much of South Africa. The project team is now working with Conservation SA and smallholder farmers in the Matatiele region of the Eastern Cape to explore alternative value chain arrangements that will allow those farmers to link to higher-value markets.
    Other activities
    The project has developed, trialled and is now implementing two survey instruments: i) Value Addition Information Management System (VAIMS) to measure livestock value chain performance and identify improvement scenarios; and ii) Psychological Profiling tool used to test all project smallholder farmers and those in a similar Poultry Value Chain project. The psychological profiles will be matched with farmer business performance to enable farmer training methods to be better customised for individual farmers.
    Good progress has also been made on development of new decision-support tools to assist small-scale farmers to best manage grazing capacity and stocking rates and to evaluate different production systems to maximise the profitability and sustainability of their businesses.

    Collaborating Institutions
    University of Adelaide, Australia
    Agricultural Research Council, South Africa
    National Agricultural Marketing Council, South Africa
    Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, South Africa
    Overview Objectives

    Beef production is an important farming practice in the Republic of South Africa. Cattle from poor rural communities comprise about 40% of the national herd but are relatively unproductive and non-profitable, contributing only 5% to South Africa’s gross domestic product from beef. The beef market is currently dominated by grain-fed beef supplied from commercial feedlots. However, many emerging and smallholder farmers prefer to keep pasture-fed, older animals, and these deliver lower market prices. A study conducted during the design of this project demonstrated that there is niche consumer demand for the kind of meat produced by these farmers. This project will investigate whether a high-value beef product/s can be developed from these animals to meet consumers’ needs, which is cost-effective for all players in the value chain to produce and deliver. Building on previous ACIAR work with cattle farmer networks (Beef Profit Partnerships), it will develop and deliver tools to enable farmers to better understand consumer and market preferences, and to make more effective business decisions. The research will contribute to better cattle production by emerging and smallholder farmers, improved incomes for rural communities, and a greater supply of local meat for South Africa’s consumers.

    Project Budget
    $1,337,261.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1470987
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of New England
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    2351
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/12/2017

    Improving market integration for high value fruit and vegetable production systems in Indonesia

    Project Leader
    Professor Randy Stringer
    Email
    randy.stringer@adelaide.edu.au
    Fax
    08 8313 7109
    Phone
    08 8313 7123
    Project Country
    Inactive project countries
    Project ID: 
    AGB/2009/060
    Australian Partner
    Start Date
    01/12/2013
    Project Coordinator Fax
    02 6217 0501
    Reference Number
    TA-201910-35326
    Project Type
    Bilateral
    Project Status
    Active
    Finish Date
    31/08/2018
    Commissioned Organisation: 
    University of Adelaide, Australia
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    Project Coordinator Email
    rodd.tyer@aciar.gov.au
    Commissioned Organisation
    University of Adelaide, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Australia
    Overview Collaborators
    • Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia
    • Indonesian Centre for Horticulture Research and Development, Indonesia
    ACIAR Research Program Manager
    Dr Rodd Dyer
    Collaborating Institutions
    Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia
    Indonesian Centre for Horticulture Research and Development, Indonesia
    Program Areas
    Overview Objectives

    The reasons why so few Indonesian smallholder farmers are able to move up the value ladder into more competitive, profitable markets are not well documented. Policymakers lack knowledge of successes from promoting small farm participation in Indonesia’s modern horticultural chains. This project aims to promote the growth and development of Indonesia’s fresh fruit and vegetable value chains, focusing on ways that smallholders and rural communities can participate and benefit more fully. The project will formulate lessons learned from past research; determine factors influencing success of farmer and trader links to modern markets; strengthen engagement between industry, government and researchers; and build capacity of researchers and policymakers. The research will collect data on producers, traders, and food retailers using literature reviews, surveys with key stakeholders and case studies. Expected impacts include higher returns to Indonesian smallholders, improved productivity and quality products, and more efficient and competitive domestic fruit and vegetable value chains.

    Project Budget
    $1,359,552.00
    Grant Report Value
    $1495507
    Grant Report Recipient
    University of Adelaide
    Grant Report Recipient Post Code
    5064
    Grant Report Finish Date
    31/08/2018
    Grant Report Start Date
    16/12/2013

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